Tag Archives: Children’s Health

Mary’s Winter Immune Boosting Regimen, Part 3

Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 3 from Beeyoutiful.com

Today I’m sharing the last of the steps that I use to support my family’s health during the cooler months. I have led you on the same path that I take when encouraging and supporting my family’s health, and tried to share ideas on how I use each category of tools. Take a look back at Parts One and Two to see what we’ve covered together so far.

Sometimes, I’ll selectively use one or two to relieve a symptom, such as a particularly nasty sore throat or a fever that’s spiked higher than is comfortable.

I’ve learned over the years the remedies that I’m comfortable and confident in applying on my own, and what’s the most safe in our specific circumstances. Your own family’s health situation is unique, so of course, we always advise seeing your family healthcare provider to ensure you are caring for yourself and your family properly, especially in the case of worsening illness.

Here is how I use the strongest category of tools with my family to help decrease illness and boost health.

9. Herbal Tinctures – Whether they’re extracts I have purchased or made at home, tinctures are a great way to stop illnesses in their tracks! We use a variety of tinctures in our home to help support the liver and digestive and respiratory systems, and to aid the body when suffering specific symptoms or discomforts.

Try some of our family’s favorites.

  • Elderberry Tincture – Sometimes it can be hard to get larger amounts of elderberry syrup in your little ones, and concentrated tinctures are a great way to get the benefits without the larger volume.
  • Milk Thistle Tincture –  This helps to support the liver and aid the body when suffering from illness.
  • Wormwood – Not the best tasting, but a great way to help decrease candida infections.
  • Red Raspberry Tincture – Soothing and a great boost to the immune system with a large amount of vitamins and minerals.
  • Mullein – Soothing and calming, and supports glandular health.
  • Lobelia – Very good for the respiratory system, and can also be used externally to help decrease coughs.
  • Barberry – We have found this is not only incredible for liver support, but will also stop a cold in its tracks!

How to make a simple tincture

Vodka or Brandy (you may also use vinegar or vegetable glycerin)
Dried or Fresh Herbs
A clean jar

Select the herb and liquid combination. If using fresh herbs, your ratio of herb to liquid should be 1:2; with dried herbs, the ratio is 1:4. Add your herb to the jar, and then cover with the appropriate amount of liquid. Put the lid on and give a thorough mixing by shaking gently.

Let the jar sit on a windowsill or countertop for 2-4 weeks, occasionally giving it a gentle shake. When it has steeped sufficiently, strain out the herbs and pour the infused liquid into a dark glass container. I use bottles with dropper tops to easily dispense my tinctures.

Based on these steeping ratios, the dosage for an adult is usually considered two droppers full, and for a child 1/2 to 1 dropper. I always start with a smaller dose and work up as needed.

10. Colloidal Silver and Grapefruit Seed Extract – Sometimes despite our best efforts, it seems like we need a little extra oomph in our game plan. This is when I begin doses of Colloidal Silver or Grapefruit Seed Extract.

I use them with the knowledge that they are extremely potent and have the potential to damage gut flora. I make sure to replenish with good fermented foods and probiotics to build up a healthy diversity of gut bacteria once again.

Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 3 from Beeyoutiful.com11. Finally, I increase my use of Essential Oils. We do regularly run our diffuser and apply diluted essential oils to the bottom of our feet and spines, and while I use essential oils moderately throughout times of illness, I usually reserve aggressive use (such as hourly massages, soaks in the bath, or steam treatments) for the very end of my arsenal.

We use the Bath Salt Refill Kit to make our own bath salt soaks specific to our needs. We’ll add a drop of Lemongrass and Tea Tree to the salt and then soak during a fever, or use a drop of Ginger and Orange oils when our tummy wants to rumble.

We also like to give and receive massages to help stimulate the lymph system, as well as support the body systems affected. This is great for help when the illness is causing symptoms that are otherwise bothersome and unpleasant.

For this list of our favorite essential oils for massage, I have decided to focus on the oils that are considered kid friendly, but there are a lot of other oils that could be used. (Always check with a qualified aromatherapist or a reliable reference book to see if a specific oil should be used in your situation!)

Respiratory: Frankincense, Lavender, Tea Tree, most of the Citrus Oils (be careful to avoid sunlight for twelve hours following application due to increased photosensitivity), Chamomile and Pine.

Digestive: Ginger, Spearmint, Chamomile, and Orange

Soothing and Calming: Black Pepper, Marjoram, Lavender, and Chamomile

You can find dilution ratios in the product descriptions on each Beeyoutiful essential oil product description, or reference The Complete Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Handbook for precise instructions on how to dilute and apply essential oils when massaging.

For a list of additional oil recipes for children, head over to our Kid-Friendly Essential Oil Zone.

No matter how much we hope to avoid illness, with kids in the house the likelihood that we totally escape the sniffles or rumbly tummy is slim. So being ready and armed to fight off the monster bugs while making our families feel their best is a priority.

Assembling your arsenal and having a game plan in advance will help you better engage the enemy and come out the winner!

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Mary’s Winter Immune Boosting Regimen, Part 2

Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 2 from Beeyoutiful.com

Two weeks ago, I shared with you the first four steps I take to protect and boost my family’s health during the cooler months of the year when monster bugs tend to want to make their way into our lives. Something as simple as a slight cold can keep our family on quarantine for over two weeks as it works it way through the ranks, so letting down my guard isn’t an option!

If you missed the last post, take a few moments to read the first four steps here. You’ll want to have them in mind as you think about preventing illness this winter.

The next four steps are typically reserved for when we know we’ve been exposed to something nasty, we’re exhibiting signs of illness, or we’re already waving white flags of surrender because sickness has found us!

Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 2 from Beeyoutiful.com

5. Herbal Teas

While we already use some herbal teas to help decrease our likelihood of getting sick in the first place, I ramp up our doses when we’re facing an increased assault. We cut out most solid foods when we are first feeling down, and replace them with herbal teas and rich bone broths.

I use Red Raspberry Leaf blended with Hibiscus and Rosehips to make gallons of that I sweeten slightly with some local raw honey. This is encouraged generously as the main drink throughout the day to supply both vitamins and minerals to my little “patients.”

Other teas you may consider for general immune boosting are Herbal Immuni-Tea, Lemongrass, Lemon BalmElderberry, Nettles and Alfalfa.

If we have sore or tickly throats, I use Marshmallow Leaf, Mullein, or Slippery Elm as well.

For upset tummies, I make sure to use Chamomile, Ginger, Peppermint, or Red Raspberry Leaf.

6. Set up a chart.

I usually set up a chart of what to take each hour and start plugging in different nutritional supplements throughout the day. Here are a few of my favorite protocols.

  • Tummy Tuneup – Probiotics help boost the gut flora. Since as much as 80% of the immune system is located in the gut, healthy flora is a great support during illness.
  • Vitamin D3 – Based on research I’ve read and the recommendation of the Vitamin D Council, we increase our Vitamin D3 intake for a day or two to between 500-1000 IU per pound of body weight. (These high levels should not be sustained, but are a great way of getting Vitamin D levels to where your body needs them to fight off a temporary illness.)
  • Vitamin C – We use either Rosehip C or ChewC and take hourly to bowel tolerance. (Your body will let you know when you’ve had enough!) I find that this can often shorten an illness or decrease its severity, and Vitamin C is a must when there’s a cough involved.
  • Berry Well – We use Berry Well as needed all day long.

7. Herbal Infusions

I make strong infusions for both internal and external use. Allowing your herbs to steep for an extended period of time helps to release the nutrients even further for a fomentation or even a strong herbal tea. I have included several examples of how we use infusions.

Mullein Garlic Oil recipe from Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 2 from Beeyoutiful.comGarlic and Mullein Oil are great both for ear aches and for gently massaging the lymph nodes to encourage proper drainage.

Mullein Garlic Oil
1 head Fresh Raw Garlic
1 oz dried mullein leaves
Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Peel and chop up the garlic and place in a small jar with the mullein leaves. Cover with olive oil and cap the jar tightly. Leave in a window for 2-4 weeks to allow to infuse.

If you need the infused oil more quickly, you can use a double boiler to gently and slowly warm it for about two hours on the stovetop. Cool before placing in a jar.

This infusion will last for three months in a cool dark cabinet, and over six months in the refrigerator. Strain out the garlic and herbs before use.

Garlic Poultices: When we have fevers or upper respiratory infections, I will make a garlic poultice and apply to the feet and chest. This often will bring relief and help boost the immune system and eliminate the cause of the fever. Watch this short video to see exactly how to use a garlic poultice.

Sore Throat Love recipe from Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 2 from Beeyoutiful.comI use Lobelia and Mullein for sore throats and coughs.

Sore Throat Love
3 Tbs Mullein
3 Tbs Lobelia
1/2 cup freshly boiled water

In a glass bowl, add herbs and freshly boiled water. Stir to incorporate the herbs in the water, adding more water if needed. Allow to brew for 20-30 minutes. Strain out herbs and reserve the brewed liquid.

Thoroughly saturate a clean cotton cloth in the herbal liquid, then wring out until it is damp but not dripping. Apply the cloth to the neck and wrap gently around the neck. To keep it in place, I use a piece of PUL fabric and lightly wrap it over the fomentation and around the neck as well.

We use this remedy at the first sign of a sore throat, even sleeping overnight with the fomentation on the throat. This promotes health, soothes irritation, and encourages the lymph system to drain.

  • Sage and Thyme Decoction – While it’s not the tastiest tea in the world, this strong tea is great for when breathing has become a chore. We suggest using 2 Tablespoons each of Sage and Thyme in 2 cups of freshly boiled water. Steep for 20-30 minutes and then give by the spoonful as tolerated. You can add to a small amount of bone broth to make more palatable.

8. More Herbs

The last step we’ll cover today is dried, ground, or encapsulated herbs. These can give your body small, concentrated punches of nutrients with easy doses. They can be added to smoothies or taken in capsules.

In addition to taking it as a tea, I also recommend using Red Raspberry Leaf capsules when you do not have access to the tea or simply need extra. It is high in Vitamins A, B, C, and E. It also has an impressive mineral content with potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and more. This is a handy way to use it when you’re out of town or just away from the house.

Other herbs we use encapsulated or dried are Slippery Elm in smoothies for sore throats, Cayenne to boost health and help with digestion, Plantain for digestive problems, and Ginger for stomach problems. We use Turmeric in soups and golden milk, or encapsulate it for ease of use.

In my next post, I will wrap up our series with the last three steps and the other supportive measures we use. We would love to hear what you use with your family! Tell us in the comments about your favorite tips!

Mary’s Winter Immune Boosting Regimen, Part 1

Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 1 from Beeyoutiful.com

As a seasoned mom of five, I have come to expect that starting around October we may have some occasional challenges to our family’s health during the next 4-5 months. I hate it, I detest it, I even beg my husband to move us to the Florida Keys or a Caribbean Island where we don’t have to deal with cold weather at all… but since that hasn’t happened yet, I have my winter arsenal ready.

Early this year, Stephanie shared a chart that shows the Risks of Adverse Affects of various health treatments. It shows the progression in side effects from minimal to higher through a variety of treatment options. It surprised me to realize that over the years, this has also become my progression in how I treat our family when we are either run down or struggling to fight something off.

Today, I’m starting a series to share with you some of my favorite ways to treat our family, using the same chart and progressing through it.

Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 1 from Beeyoutiful.com1. At the first sign of illness, we start by both increasing whole and nutrient-dense foods, and eliminating all empty calories (such as processed foods, sugars, and white flours). This time of year is full of get-togethers around bonfires or for holidays; it can be hard to withstand the onslaught of treats, but we have learned that it is best for our health to avoid as much sugar as possible.

I’ve noticed that, in general, the times we have gotten the sickest were when we were often indulging in sweets. Using healthy fats and keeping a supply of different flavors in our kitchen helps us feel satisfied and not even crave the sweets! This step is primarily preventative, but should definitely be implemented if you are sick or have been exposed to illness.

2. Secondly, and also in the category of preventative, I increase the amount of culinary herbs used in our foods and add as much bone broth as we can into daily use. This gives us an extra helping of these natural immune boosters and good nutrients that help nourish and repair the body. We also add a heaping spoonful of gelatin powder to our soups to support gut health.

Some of our family favorite herbs are Oregano, Basil, Thyme, Marjoram, Garlic, and Turmeric.

Herbal Broth recipe from Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 1 Beeyoutiful.comI also make an herbal “broth” that I use as a base when cooking rice or potatoes.

Herbal Broth

Gently simmer all ingredients in 3 cups of water for 1-2 hours. Strain and reserve broth for soup bases or to cook rice, potatoes, or noodles. Or make this broth in larger quantities and freeze portions for ease of use during the winter.

3. While not on the lower steps of the chart, I also take some precautionary measures when going out in public. With the regular use of over-the-counter medications that mask the symptoms of illness, it seems nowadays that no one stays home when they’re sick. Sometimes it is hard to even realize you’re sick when you’re propped up by medicine, so boosting immunity when out and about is a great idea.

  • Berry Well – We take a dose of Berry Well Classic before going out. If you need to avoid echinacea, use Berry Well Spice or Berry Well Jr.
  • Herbal Immuni-Tea – We either enjoy a cup of warm tea with breakfast, or take it along cold in our water bottles to sip on throughout the day.
  • Immuni-T Essential Oil Blend – For children under the age of 10, I put Kid’s Immuni-T rollerball on feet and spine. I’ve also made a great blend for wipes that I carry with us when we’re out.Sanitizing Solution recipe from Mary's Winter Immune-Boosting Regimen Pt 1 Beeyoutiful.comSanitizing Solution for Cloth Wipes40 drops of undiluted Immuni-T
    1 Tbs of Real Witch Hazel
    8 Ounces Aloe Vera Gel
    1/2 tsp Vitamin E OilMix thoroughly and add to a small spray bottle. I spray this on several cloth wipes and carry in a small repurposed wipes container in my diaper bag. Use to wipe hands while you’re away from home.

4. Another step we take as a preventative, or when we’ve just begun feeling unwell, is using some Whole Food Supplements such as Cod Liver Oil, Butter Oil, Liquid Chlorophyll, and Floradix to help boost our nutrients and hopefully allow the body’s defenses to naturally keep us healthy.

Click here for Part 2 where I share with you the next four steps we take to guard our family’s health!

Foodie Friday: Healthy Lunch Ideas For Kids (plus free printable!)

#FoodieFriday- Healthy Lunch Ideas For Kids (plus free printable!) from Beeyoutiful.com

Heading back to school with healthy food can be a challenge for any parent. Here are some of our favorite ideas to make that daily task a little easier.

1. Turkey and cheese roll ups

Layer nitrate-free turkey slices with raw cheddar cheese and roll up. Bonus: add a slice of avocado for additional healthy fats.

2. Smoothies

Smoothies are a great way to add nutrients to a lunch! You can sneak fruit, vegetables, kefir, and superfoods such as beet root powder and Vitamin C powder into the blend and no one will even notice. We also add things like Liquid SuperKids, Kelp Powder, and Slippery Elm Bark Powder. If you are packing a lunch ahead of time, you can freeze the smoothies the night before and use is as an ice pack as they thaw in time for lunch!

#FoodieFriday- Healthy Lunch Ideas For Kids (plus free printable!) from Beeyoutiful.com 3. Kefir Ranch Dip and Veggies

Incorporating kefir into favorite recipes is a great way to get some raw cultures into your littles.

  • 2 cups kefir or plain yogurt (preferably homemade)
  • 2 tsp dried parsley flakes
  • 1 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1 tsp garlic granules
  • 1 fresh garlic clove, minced
  • 1½ tsp sea salt
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper

Mix together and serve with sliced raw veggies such as bell peppers, cucumbers, and carrots.

4. Add a color

Pack a variety of colors in fruit and vegetables to get a variety of nutrients. This broadens the array of nutrients available, and helps get your kids used to eating a variety of foods.

5. Use leftovers

Reheat yummy food from dinner the night before– nutrient-dense stews and soups are especially suitable– and pack in a thermos to keep warm until lunchtime.

6. Boost with herbs

Add a boost to all your stews and soups by adding 1/4 cup Astragalus to your broths (strain before using broth). Then use Turmeric Powder to season soups and stews for added yumminess and immune-boosting support.

7. Herbal Tea

Instead of sugary drinks or juices, send stevia-sweetened herbal teas! Beeyoutiful’s Immuni-Tea is an excellent selection to use for lunchbox hydration. Kid favorites also include Lemon Balm, Hibiscus, Rosehips, and Peppermint. You can even blend in some less flavorful but power-packed herbs for added nutrients.

Help your kids build healthy habits with our fun printable checklist. Get yours by clicking below!

Give me my free healthy habit checklist!

 CORRECTION: Checklist should recommend ½ ounce of water per pound of body weight, NOT 2 ounces. We apologize for the error!

Healthy Habits Checklist for Kids from Beeyoutiful.com

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Guest Post: How to help your sensory child sleep better and focus better in school

How to help your sensory child sleep better and focus better in school from Beeyoutiful.com

Today’s guest post is by Lora Jacobson.

It’s here!

That time of the year when we pack lunches and backpacks, set out clothing, and make sure our child is stocked up with school supplies. Or maybe you’re putting the final touches on your curriculum plans and rethinking the space ideas for your home studies.

Whether you’ve been at this for a few weeks now and have already settled into a routine, or you’re still a week or two out and are savoring the last few days of summer break (or maybe you’re actually waiting with bated breath for the fall routine!)… are you prepared?!

How to help your sensory child sleep better and focus better in school

There are two things that can torpedo your child’s learning faster than anything else.

They exacerbate her ability to cope with stress, introduce reactionary behaviors that are frustrating for herself and everyone involved, and create tension where everyone just wants to relax and have fun.

Your young student is bouncing around in his seat and can’t manage to stay quiet while his teacher attempts to address the class; he tries to sit and do his schoolwork, but struggles to focus in class or at home.

Perhaps your student does brilliantly at school, but struggles because the sensory overload puts her under so much stress that she comes home to an almost guaranteed meltdown and the teachers have no idea what’s going wrong.

You’ve gotten to know your child so well that you can spot the meltdowns coming from a mile away, but prevention still feels elusive. Some small, seemingly insignificant thing takes place that becomes the proverbial straw on the camel’s back, and she melts because everything is just too much and it feels as if the world is ending.

Sound familiar? You’ve been there, haven’t you?

How to help your sensory child sleep better and focus better in school from Beeyoutiful.com

Sleep disturbance and sensory processing issues typically come hand in hand, regardless of whether the egg or the chicken comes first. The reasons or the possible diagnoses are different for every kid.

Maybe it’s sensory processing disorder, or ADD/ADHD, or Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or a handful of other possibilities. Or maybe somewhere along the line she never got on into a good sleep rhythm and it’s affecting every part of her life.

Whatever it is, you are certain (no matter what your in-laws say behind your back) that it’s more than just your child “being a kid” or a need for “better discipline”; your child is not “just picky” or “too impulsive”. It’s more than that (1).

It was occupational therapists (OTs) who initially began identifying an explanation for a lot of otherwise puzzling behaviors. They combine the works of innovators such as Patricia Wilbarger, OTR and Dr. A. Jean Ayres to holistically address the sensory needs of each patient. They evaluate the individual’s over- and under-sensitivities in each of the senses (the traditional five: sound, taste, touch, smell, vision, plus two more: proprioceptive, and vestibular).

One person described our sensory processes as each of us having big cups or small cups, and we can have big cups or small cups in different senses at the same time.

When our cup is large, we can’t get enough stimulation or input and continue to seek that input (a child that can’t get enough vestibular input might seek more through bouncing and crashing and jumping, for example).

When our cup is small, we are easily overwhelmed by that input and can react to that very strongly. Nobody likes scratchy tags in their clothing, for example, but for some the input of even a seam is so strong that they can’t adjust or think of anything else until their clothing is changed, modified, or turned inside out.

OTs will work with a patient to help them find the input that they are seeking and help them increase their ability to handle stimulation that overwhelms them. As one kid said, “…it helps to go to an occupational therapist. When I leave, my body feels better; it feels like my body is in control” (2).

How to help your sensory child sleep better and focus better in school

Photo Credit: limaoscarjuliet via Compfight cc

One of the awesome things about occupational therapy is that most (if not all) of the therapy is non-pharmaceutical and non-invasive. When specifically addressing sleep disturbances, OTs assist families in making careful trial changes to bedtime routines, habits, and patterns, and use various strategies and interventions to address sensory avoiding or sensory seeking behaviors.

Some of the things that they might use include: Walburger protocol, loose or tight pajamas, lightweight or weighted blankets, isometric exercises, brushing or beanbag tapping techniques, etc. (3, 4) Some of the benefits of sensory integration therapy include the ability to transition between activities, an improved ability to pay attention, and an increase in self-regulation (5).

While scientists have had a difficult time isolating exactly WHY these therapies work (there are lots of theories, but few long-term clinical studies), it has become commonly accepted that they are helpful and, when applied thoughtfully and with an OTs guidance, they can be extremely beneficial.

If you do a Google search on “sensory activities” or “sensory toys” that can be used as part of sensory integration therapy, you will find more products, hacks, and DIYs than you ever dreamed, all designed to help your child get the stimulation they are looking for in an effective manner. But today I’m going to narrow our focus to just two products that address your child’s sleep and focus: weighted blankets and weighted lap pads, respectively.

You can know if your child would benefit from a weighted blanket and how to go about shopping for one.

What is a weighted blanket?

Do you remember sleeping under your great-grandma’s quilt and how the heaviness of it felt comforting? It’s kinda like that. The deep pressure sensation of a weighted blanket covering the body can calm one’s system down and feel like a hug if you drape it just right. The blanket becomes the go-to comfort blanket and sleep aid and sense of security, which is especially useful for sleep.

When I make weighted blankets and lap pads, I pay special attention to the texture of the blanket for those who are particularly touch-sensitive.

If a weighted blanket is too large to be appropriate for the setting (like in a school classroom, for example), a weighted lap pad is the perfect substitute. Some find they really need the weight to help keep them focused.

The pressure from the weight allows a child to self-organize which encourages her to relax when hyper, restless, or stressed, making transitions from one activity to another more seamless and avoiding (or calming) meltdowns. There are parents who have borrowed their child’s weighted blanket so they can have their OWN #sensoryoverload time-out!

How to help your sensory child sleep better and focus better in school

Last year, one of the teachers in our local elementary school permanently “borrowed” the new lap pad from the special education department. Upon inquiry (because the SE dept wanted it back!) administration discovered that one of her students who had previously been unable to focus and whose movement was consistently distracting the other students was suddenly able to focus on his studies when he used the weighted lap pad.

The teachers and school administration were so excited about this child’s success! They told me it was “like magic” and ordered several additional weighted lap pads for other students both in and outside the special education department. (This makes it the perfect companion for something like Beeyoutiful’s essential oil blend, Bee Focused).

How do I know if my child needs a weighted blanket?

How to help your sensory child sleep better and focus better in school

  • Does your child pile on the blankets or pillows in order to sleep?
  • Do you wish you could get him a blanket that would be heavy but magically also not make him overheat?
  • Does she ask for someone to lay on top of her to calm her or help her organize herself?
  • Does he find the weight of a dentist’s x-ray apron comforting?

While this is not a exhaustive list, if you answered YES to those questions, then it is highly likely that a weighted blanket is the perfect choice for supporting your child’s healthy sleep patterns. The calming properties, the relaxation, the sense that all is right in the world: all those things promote sleep — getting to sleep, getting to a deep sleep, staying asleep.

Parents of kids who have struggled with disturbed sleep for years (some well into their elementary years) report that their child finally SLEPT ALL NIGHT after beginning to use a weighted blanket.

I’m sure my child needs one — how do I go about shopping for a weighted blanket?!

That’s a great question! That’s exactly why I prepared a free print-friendly checklistHow to Shop for a Weighted Blanket or Lap Pad.

I’m a big fan and long-time customer of Beeyoutiful (it all started with SuperMom and I just can’t quit!) so for a limited time, fellow Beeyoutiful fans, followers, and customers who download the guide will ALSO get an exclusive coupon for use at Lora’s Weighted Blankets that will be good for free shipping with purchase of a lap pad when the new lap pad collection is released over Labor Day weekend.

Click here and get your coupon and free download today!

Do you know someone who could benefit from reading Lora’s advice today? How could incorporating her strategies help someone in your own family? Let us know!

Sources:

1. Sensory Processing Issues Explained: Tantrums, clumsiness, ‘immaturity’ all could point to problems taking in the world, by Beth Arky, Published: October 26, 2011 http://www.childmind.org/en/posts/articles/2011-10-26-sensory-processing-issues-explained

2. A Child’s View of Sensory Processing, posted by ESGWNRM on Jul 5, 2012 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1G5ssZlVUw&feature=youtu.be

3. Fact Sheet for American Occupational Therapy Association, developed by Meryl Marger Picard, MSW, OTR, 2012 “Occupational Therapy’s Role in Sleep”, direct download linked here: http://www.aota.org/About-Occupational-Therapy/Professionals/CY.aspx

4. The Sensory Modulation Program for Adolescents & Adults , by Tina Champagne, ME.d., OTR/L, posted 2008

http://www.ot-innovations.com/content/view/38/28/

5. Therapeutic Brushing Techniques: The Wilbarger Deep Pressure and Proprioceptive Technique (DPPT) & Oral Tactile Technique (OTT) by Tina Champagne, 2007http://www.ot-innovations.com/content/view/55/46/

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Six Ways to Bid Farewell to Cradle Cap

#HowToTuesday- Six Ways to Bid Farewell to Cradle Cap from Beeyoutiful.com

While cradle cap does not affect the health of the baby, it can be something that is unsightly and it’s usually a sign of underlying health and nutrition needs.

While the underlying factors are not entirely understood, we do know that there is a connection between the hormone levels in the mother and a topical yeast or fungal infection that can affect the baby. Thankfully, there are some wonderful and natural ways we can work to help eliminate cradle cap.

pin #HowToTuesday- Six Ways to Bid Farewell to Cradle Cap from Beeyoutiful.com (1)Omega 3’s

The emphasis on having sufficient Omega fatty acids has increased in the last several decades. Maternal supplies play a huge role, and it’s highly encouraged to take either Cod Liver Oil or Omega 3‘s while breastfeeding a young infant. Older infants can have Cod Liver Oil or Omega 3’s added to their own diets once they have begun solids.

Food

Eliminate foods in both mom and baby’s diets that may be contributing to fungal overgrowth. Common triggers include but are not limited to wheat, gluten, dairy, sugar, and soy.

Water

Eliminate soaps and other cleansing products; warm water is usually sufficient for baby’s bath. Harsh soaps can strip an infant’s skin of protective natural compounds.

Run a humidifier during dry times of the year to keep baby’s skin from drying out.

Lavender

Gently massage a few drops (you don’t need much!) of Lavender Infused Oil into baby’s scalp. It’s a great way to nourish and moisturize any dry skin.

Lavender Infused Oil

2 cups of dried lavender blossoms
Olive Oil

Add the lavender blossoms to a clean mason jar. Cover with olive oil, cap tightly, and place jar in a window for a week. Shake occasionally. Strain out the blossoms, then store the infused oil in a clean glass jar in the fridge.

Cradle Cap Treatment

1/4 cup pure aloe vera gel
3 drops of Lavender Essential Oil

Mix together and rub into the skin a few times a day, or cover well and let sit overnight. Then use a soft brush to gently wash out baby’s hair.

Have you found other gentle remedies for cradle cap? Share your experience with other parents by leaving a comment here. We love to learn from our readers!
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Unexpected Keys to Supporting Kids with ADHD

Unexpected Keys to Supporting Kids with ADHD from Beeyoutiful.com

Esther writes:

I grew up in the denim jumpers and homemade bread era of homeschooling, and wanted nothing more than to be like all the other cool kids who got to eat bologna sandwiches and wear jeans.

As a second generation homeschooler, I came to the table with more than my fair share of things I was going to do differently in educating my children.

I wasn’t going to be mean like my mother and have my children crochet daisies while eating bean soup and talking about Uzbekistan.

No siree, my kids were going to get dressed every day and sit at reclaimed Anthropologie-esque desks while we did school properly with real home work and tests and grades.

Dill Pickles, Hedgehogs, and Lemon Trees- Unexpected Keys to Supporting Kids with ADHD from Beeyoutiful.com Find out today how our friend Esther Ramsey’s experience really turned out over at Hip Homeschool Moms.

Then come back and read Esther’s other helpful post about building a toolbox to support her children’s brains!

Does someone you love struggle with focus and attention? Which strategies have worked for you? Let us know in the comments below; we’d love to learn from you. 

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