Foodie Friday: How to Create Your Own Herbal Tea Blends (Plus a Recipe!)

#FoodieFriday- How to Create Your Own Herbal Tea Blends (Plus a Recipe!) from Beeyoutiful.com

#FoodieFriday- How to Create Your Own Herbal Tea Blends (Plus a Recipe!) from Beeyoutiful.com (2)Few things bring comfort to my mind as much as a warm cup of herbal tea on a crisp fall day. As the temperatures drop and leaves turn, my morning routine has begun to steadily include a mug or two of my favorite herbal delights! It is soothing, helps me slow down a bit and awakens me for the day, but even better, this liquid supports my body with vital nutrients and encourages my healthy immune system. How blessed we are that something so good for us is also so delicious.

While mixing blends is something anyone can do, there is some art to mixing a tea that is not only delicious but provides the nutritional support you need. You can have some delicious teas that lack nutritional density, or you can have a bitter stout teas that work beautifully but are literally hard to swallow! Learning to select a careful balance of herbs that have both taste and active properties, and that pair well, is the key.

Often herbs or spices fall into both categories, such as Cinnamon, Elderberries, Lemon Balm, and Hibiscus. They are all very nutrient dense while being quite tasty as well. Using these along with a more herbaceous tasting selection helps to cover the less delectable flavor and take your cup of grassy flavored water to a new level of bold fruity or spicy flavors.

#FoodieFriday- How to Create Your Own Herbal Tea Blends (Plus a Recipe!) from Beeyoutiful.com (1)When crafting an herbal tea, start by selecting your target outcomes. For example, if you’ve awakened with a scratchy throat and want to soothe and lend nutritional support, you’ll want to select herbs and spices to support throat health.

These could include (but definitely are not limited to) Slippery Elm Bark, Marshmallow Leaf or Root, Mullein, Cinnamon Bark, Elderberries, Hibiscus, Rosehips, Elderflower, Licorice Root, Garlic, and Cayenne. Now a big infusion of these herbs might help the sore throat, but wowzers! It might be really hard to get down.
Selecting a few of the powerful favorites and then pairing them with some flavorful teas will make a sip you will not only benefit from but enjoy drinking.

From these, I suggest selecting several that have historical benefits for the throat; Slippery Elm, Mullein, Marshmallow and Licorice Root would be my base. I’d use equal parts of each, and then add Cinnamon Bark, Orange Peel, Lemon Balm and Clove to help lend a little flavor. Licorice Root’s spicy warmth helps marry the flavors between the two groups.

Here’s a recipe for my favorite Throat Love Herbal Tea Blend.

2 Tbs Slippery Elm Bark
2 Tbs Mullein
2 Tbs Marshmallow Leaf
2 Tbs Licorice Root
1 Tbs Cinnamon Bark
1 Tbs Orange Peel
1 Tbs Lemon Balm
1 Tbs Cloves

Mix together and store in a dark glass or metal container. Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup. Steep in freshly boiled water for 10-15 minutes. Sweeten with honey or stevia to taste. Enjoy!

Herbal tea blends can be quite expensive, with some specialty blends costing as much as $50 or more per pound. A pound will make quite a few cups of tea, but knowing how to blend your own teas allows you to create your own unique flavors while going easier on the budget.

We would love to hear your favorite blends or recipes! Try out some of Beeyoutiful’s Tea Blends and let us know what you think.

Happy Tea Drinking!

Mary Ewing, Family Herbalist#FoodieFriday- How to Create Your Own Herbal Tea Blends (Plus a Recipe!) from Beeyoutiful.com

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