Tag Archives: Winter 2010 Catalog

What You C is What You Get – Winter 2010 Catalog

What You C Is What You Get

Christy StoufferChristy Stouffer

Perhaps the most well-known vitamin is the all-important C, also known as ascorbate acid. But for all of its popularity, it may be one of the least-understood vitamins. We all know we need it, but why? And what happens if we don’t have it?

Vitamin C builds tissue and collagen. Playing the role of protector to our bodies, it heals wounds, while strengthening bones, cartilage, and teeth. The mighty C mobilizes iron, stimulates the immune system, and battles free radicals. This powerhouse helps prevent colds and the flu, and some researchers believe it even blocks the growth of cancer cells.

Vitamin C is recommended in high doses for people who suffer from acne, irritable bowel syndrome, asthma, autism, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. Low levels of Vitamin C have been linked to a variety of ailments including gall bladder disease, poor healing of wounds, bleeding gums, frequent colds, easy bruising, anemia, gingivitis, respiratory infections, high blood pressure, and buildup of plaque in arteries. I wonder how many folks could stay out of the doctor’s office simply by boosting their intake of Vitamin C!

The Wash-away Vitamin

Because Vitamin C is water-soluble-meaning our bodies can’t store it-we need to monitor our diets to ensure that this life-giving vitamin is part of our daily lives. And since our bodies don’t synthesize Vitamin C, we need to ingest it regularly.
Fortunately, Vitamin C is plentiful and available in many different foods, but unfortunately, that doesn’t always assure we get the Vitamin C we need. What factors contribute to a deficiency of Vitamin C? One obvious answer is that many people simply don’t eat the right foods or take C supplements. But a too-often overlooked cause is the inappropriate preparation and storage of foods that contain Vitamin C.

About 25% of Vitamin C is lost when foods are blanched, boiled, or cooked. Freezing also contributes to the loss of potency in Vitamin C-rich foods. When fruits and vegetables are canned and then reheated, only about one-third of the original Vitamin C content remains. The best way to obtain Vitamin C dietarily is through eating raw foods.

The following foods, in particular, ought to be regulars on your grocery list because they are excellent sources of Vitamin C:

Broccoli

Bell peppers

Papaya

Oranges

Kale

Cauliflower

Strawberries

Raspberries

Asparagus

Celery

Kiwi

Mustard and turnip     greens

Brussels sprouts

Spinach

Cantaloupe

Grapefruit

Zucchini

To prevent the loss of Vitamin C in food preparation, follow these techniques:

  • Serve fruits and vegetables raw whenever possible.
  • Steam, boil, or simmer foods in a small amount of water.
  • Cook potatoes in their skins (be sure to wash the dirt off the outside of the potato first!).
  • Keep cut, raw fruits and vegetables stored in an airtight container and refrigerate (but not in water-if raw foods are stored in water, the inherent Vitamin C will dissolve).

C for Yourself

I try to provide my family with ample amounts of Vitamin C through a good diet. But in reality, we sometimes come up short. Busy schedules, food likes and dislikes, food availability, and other factors mean that I, as my family’s nutritionist, must make sure our bodies are supplied with Vitamin C through supplements.

While there are some fine supplements on the market, I especially like the convenient Beeyoutiful options:Vit_C

  • Gentle C comes in capsule form. For family members who can’t (or dislike) swallowing pills, the contents of the capsules can be dissolved in drinks or sprinkled on foods. Gentle C has an added benefit of calcium which, when combined with the Vitamin C, provides an easily digestible supplement commonly known as buffered C. The added benefit of citrus bioflavonoids supports blood flow.
  • Rosehip C delivers the vitamin as ascorbic acid through tablets. It offers an extra boost with acerola powder and rose hips. Rose hips-provided by the berry-like fruit derived from rose bushes after the bloom has dried-provide a higher C content than citrus fruits. Acerola powder contains high levels of C as well as magnesium, potassium, Vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, iron, calcium, and phosphorus. The addition of acerola gives Rosehip C more power to assist with illnesses and may prevent colds and flu.

“Vitamin” is derived from the Latin word vita, meaning “life.” Vitamins sustain life, and none is more essential than Vitamin C. One way or another, it’s up to you to make sure you give your body all the C it needs.

Exercise Your Right to be Pain-Free – Winter 2010 Catalog

by Nancy Webster

nancy_small

Doctors would say my right elbow suffers from bursitis or “tennis elbow.” Lifting the gallon jars of our cow’s fresh milk from the fridge had become a killer chore, thanks to joint pain triggered by the bending and twisting required to milk our cow. If I weren’t dubious about medicine, cortisone would be the answer.


Instead of doing drugs, though, I started doing Windmills, the Static Wall Clock, and the Progressive Groin Stretch four to six times per week. Within a few sessions of these and several other healing exercises, my right shoulder and hip—the real culprits in my problem—regained function and stopped making my elbow do work it wasn’t meant to do. The pain subsided. No drugs. No surgery.


The feet and ankles of Grace, our 13-year-old daughter with Down syndrome, are so pronated (rolled inward) that they cause pain in her knees and hips. The typical solution is shoe orthotics and leg braces, but Grace does Knee Pillow Squeezes, the Floor Block, and the Air Bench, among the exercises in her routine. The resulting strengthened muscles are helping hold her body correctly, and we no longer hear regular complaints about her aching legs. Even more exciting: she won’t have to wear cumbersome and expensive orthopedic aids.


Pain-free Secrets Revealed


The drug and surgery-free answer to your skeletal pain issues is found in the landmark book Pain Free by Pete Egoscue, a nationally renowned physiologist and sports injury consultant to some of today’s top athletes. The Egoscue method claims an astounding 95-percent success rate in relieving chronic pain, the key to which is a series of gentle exercises and carefully constructed stretches called Egoscuecises or E-cises. These strengthen specific muscles and bring the body back to its proper alignment and full, pain-free functioning.


The Egoscue book contains photographs and step-by-step instructions for dozens of E-cises specifically designed to provide quick and lasting relief from:

  • Lower back pain, hip problems, sciatica, and bad knees;

  • Migraines and other headaches, stiff neck, and sore shoulders;

  • Shin splints, sprained or weak ankles, and many foot ailments;

  • Bursitis, tendinitis, and much more.


It also features preventive programs for maintaining health throughout body. So even if you are not hurting right now, you can prevent future pain and keep your body in alignment with the E-cises in Pain Free. The book is a wonderful gift of hope and knowledge for loved ones with chronic aches and pains. (Pain Free can be found on page 14 of our Winter 2010 catalog.)


How the Book Works

To educate and care for hurting people, Egoscue clinics have been established in major cities around the world. Our local advisor and friend, Cecilia Brewer, is currently in training to be an Egoscue instructor and says Pain Free book owners can achieve satisfying results even without a personal exercise consultant. The best approach is to choose four or five E-cises from any section of the book. Repeat those E-cises four to six times per week for one or two weeks until your muscles start to “remember” the proper place to hold the skeleton. Then follow a new menu of E-cises for another week or two, and so on. Because the body’s frame is interconnected, E-cises in the foot section, for example, will benefit the neck, so any combination can help your situation.

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In making your exercise plan, note that one E-cise, the Supine Groin Stretch, stands above the others and should be included as part of every menu. This stretch can be done at the conclusion of the day’s menu, or it can be done at a separate time during the day, depending on how much time you have available. While you can improvise E-cise equipment using a belt, a chair, a pile of books, and throw pillows, I highly recommend purchasing the Egoscue “tower” which makes doing the Supine Groin Stretch much simpler (the tower is available from the Egoscue website www.Egoscue.com).


A Supplement to the Supplements

The folks at Beeyoutiful now offer Pain Free as its “third dimension” in health maintenance. Egoscue’s approach to physiological health provides a fitting complement to the Beeyoutiful line of supplements and information about nutrient-dense food preparation (see Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon in Beeyoutiful’s recommended books section).


The Egoscue method works wonders in place of, or in combination with, chiropractic care. When a chiropractor manually adjusts your spine, for instance, you schedule your next appointment and go home. But between appointments, muscles naturally return your spine to its previous position if you do not regularly teach and strengthen them to hold your bones in the correct place. This “teaching” is precisely what E-cises do for your body. The Egoscue premise is that all pain—even pain like carpal tunnel in your wrist—is related to the alignment of your body from head to toe, and regular E-cises maintain this alignment. The best news is that you can do them at home, for free, with phenomenal results if you are faithful.


Fearing that we had only costly “traditional” options for helping Grace, I had fairly well despaired of ever addressing her pain issues. But seeing her now pain-free is truly liberating. Discover Egoscue, and you’ll discover affordable, do-able options for managing and even healing your chronically sore feet, back, shoulders, neck, and more. The Webster family testimonies are just two of thousands from people helped by making the Egoscue method part of their lives.

Refining My Bread-Baking – Winter 2010 Catalog

Refining My Bread Baking Heritage

By Stephanie Kuvik Tallent

Steph J

I remember one special day when I was eight as if it was yesterday. My siblings and I gathered in the kitchen as Mom taught us about wheat. As homeschoolers, we learned a lot about nutrition and health because Mom routinely researched this passion of hers.

That particular wheat day, Mom explained to us the difference between white and wheat flour, pointed out the sundry parts of the wheat berry, and showed where they’re located. We learned about wheat germ, wheat bran, and how to tell the difference between the two. We examined oils in the berry and saw that once the wheat berry was ground, oil covers each speck of flour and can cause the flour to go rancid if not used soon after grinding (that’s what causes many of us to dislike the flavor of foods made from whole wheat flour bought from the store). Mom taught us about soft wheat and hard winter wheat -why they’re hard or soft and whether to use the flour made from each berry for pastries or bread. She taught us about corn, lentils, beans, rye, and oats, too, but I especially remember what we learned about wheat, probably because bread was such a regular part of life for us.

Mom made bread as often as she could from the best flour she could find, but because of what she knew about flour and wheat, she wasn’t satisfied with that. She knew the best bread would come from freshly ground flour, and she couldn’t wait to get a mill of her own.

Mill Day and Beyond

The Christmas that Dad gave Mom her long-awaited grin mill was one we all remember well. The new mill was the key that would turn her bread from something we didn’t always like inot a delectable art.

Dad grinned his “I can’t wait to give you your gift” grin for weeks before Christmas in anticipation of Mom’s surprise and pleasure. Dad and I reveled in the fun of trying to hide from Mom in her own room while wrapping the mill and a bucket of wheat berries to go with it. And none of us were disappointed by her reaction. The first thing Mom did was to read the manual from the mill from cover to cover to make sure she knew the ins and outs before using it even once. Then we all watched as Mom fired it up for the first grind. Wow! Was it ever loud! But, airplane sound and all, we watched as that wonderful machine took the wheat berry we all knew so much about and ground it into the freshest flour we had ever seen.

After that, Mom made bread just about every day, and we consumed loaf after loaf of her light fluffy specialty. Often it would be warm and fresh just in time for lunch. Oh, those morning school hours at the dining room table were torture smelling that wonderful bread baking. We could eat a whole loaf when it was warm, spread with butter and honey. Yum!

Thankfully, Mom didn’t just make bread, she also taught me how to make it. I learned that, when mixed just right, the dough should feel like a baby’s bottom. I discovered how to troubleshoot a recipe and figure out what changes to make it better the next time. I learned how long to raise it, how long to bake it, and how thick to slice it so that the bread didn’t dry out in Dad’s sandwiches before he got to eat them at lunchtime.

But after a while, we became aware of something strange. Mom and I noticed it was hard to eat a sandwich, not because the bread wasn’t tasty, but because it would sour our stomachs for hours after eating something that should have digested properly and been nourishing! We often chose not to eat our wonderful homemade bread because we knew it would ruin the rest of our day. Wondering what was going on with our bodies that we couldn’t enjoy the bread we knew was so healthy, I began to think we had developed an allergy and went on a search for an answer.

Improving the Legacy

rolls

Mom went to be with Jesus last year after Thanksgiving following a four-year battle with cancer. It has been a bittersweet time since then, filled with a lot of memories, but it has not been a year without its blessings. In particular, I’ve learned something new and exciting about bread. I now have a copy of Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon (Nourishing Traditions can be found on page 14) and in reading this wonderful informational cookbook, I learned that if you soak flour in an acidic liquid overnight, it starts the process of breaking down proteins in the bread that make it more digestible. This profound, simple key has changed my bread-baking forever. And guess what? I can eat the bread made from flour soaked overnight without getting that familiar sour stomach! What a difference in how I feel!

A few months ago, my sister and I were catching up on our daily lives, and I mentioned that I was soaking the flour for my bread these days, explained what a difference it was making in how I feel, and shared that my sour stomachs were a thing of the past. She paused to think about what I had said and told me how happy she was that I discovered this “new” information and could make bread for my family this way. Then she said something that made me smile: “You know, if Mom had discovered that, she would have been all excited about it and sharing it with us.” My sister was right. Mom would have been excited about her find and would have encouraged us to perfect our bread in this new way.

Two days after that phone conversation with my sister, I was at my Dad’s house helping him go through Mom’s belongings and decide who would like to have what, who has special memories of which items, and who Mom would have liked to continue to enjoy each thing. As Dad and I organized what was on her desk, Dad discovered recipes and handed the book to me. I glanced through Mom’s notebook and was stunned to see that it was full of information and recipes about soaking flour overnight before making bread-and about soaking other grains before eating them!

I stood in shock as the realization hit me that Mom had already discovered my “new” information. She just hadn’t gotten a chance to start making her bread this way and to share it with my sister and me before she got sick. What wonderful confirmation to me that this method of making bread was the right direction!

Mom taught me all about making bread and knew more than she even had a chance to tell me. I took that knowledge into my marriage and began making bread for my own family. Thanks to her, I’ve felt like a successful homemaker doing the things every housewife should do to nourish my family in a healthy way.

Now I think of Mom each time I make bread-and I smile. I remember the hours we spent in the kitchen grinding fresh flour, making bread, and other good things, and I wish I could give her a slice of my fresh, warm, soaked-flour bread. Knowing she was headed toward this new bread-making method drives me harder to perfect each loaf and make it a delicious success for my family. When it comes out right, I smile and say, “Thanks, Mom.”

Yeasted Buttermilk Bread Recipe:

4 cups freshly ground hard winter wheat

1 ½ cups buttermilk, warmed

½ cup extra virgin coconut oil, melted

¼ cup warm water

1 Tablespoon dry instant yeast

2 Tablespoons blackstrap Molasses

1 tsp. Salt

½ tsp. Baking Soda

1 cup unbleached organic white flour

Combine whole wheat flour, buttermilk and coconut oil in mixer. Dough should not be sticky. If needed, add a bit more flour. (A key you have the right mixture is if the sides of the bowl are clean.) Form a ball and place in the bowl, cover with cheesecloth and leave in a warm place overnight. (12-24 hours).

In the morning, combine water, molasses, salt, and baking soda in a measuring cup and mix well. Add instant yeast and cup of white flour directly to the dough and pour wet ingredients over top. Mix until it is smooth and sides of bowl are again clean. Your dough should not be tough, it should feel “soft as a baby’s bottom”, as Mom would say. Form a nice ball and again place your dough back into the bowl and cover with cheesecloth. Allow it to rise for about 2 hours or until it had doubled in size. Punch dough down, knead it for just about a minute, cut it in half and form each half into a log the size of your bread pan. Place in greased bread pan, cover with a cheesecloth and let shaped dough rise in a warm area for another 1-2 hours, or until doubled in size. Bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees. Gently cool and be sure to enjoy a warm slice.

*Note: This is Stephanie’s adapted version. For the original recipe see page 493 of Nourishing Traditions

My Bread-Making Steps: (pictures for these steps can be found on page 45 of the catalog or on the following link Winter Catalog 2010)

Step 1: Soak your flour with buttermilk and coconut oil or butter. I warm my buttermilk and melt the coconut oil together on the stove and then dump them into the mixer where I have my flour measured out.

#1

Step 2: Then I mix the buttermilk, coconut oil and flour together.

@2

Step 3: Scraping the bowl to make sure it is all mixed.

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Step 4: Getting the unleavened dough out of the bowl to knead it a bit.

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Step 5: Hand Kneading

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Step 6: Kneading

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Step 7: Place the kneaded dough back in the mixing bowl and cover with cheese cloth to culture/soak overnight.

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Step 8: In the morning, add the rest of the ingredients and your yeast and mix like you would any other bread recipe.

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Step 9: Mix and knead.

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Step 10: Starting to look like bread dough.

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Step 11: Ball of dough before the first rise.

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Step 12: First Rise. NT recipe says to let this take about 2 hours or until it doubles in size.

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Step 13: Shaped and in the pans for second rise.

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Step 14: Into the dehydrator for second rise. You can also do this at room temperature or a low temp oven, but I have found it goes quicker in a warm space.

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Step 15: Second rise complete and into the oven it goes for 30 mins at 350 degrees.

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Step 16: 2 beautifully baked loaves.

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Step 17: Inside texture is perfect! Slather with fresh butter and eat warm!!

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Stephanie Kuvik Tallent is part of the Beeyoutiful Customer Service team. Her duties include moderating and researching for Beeyoutiful’s health forum, MerryHeartMedicine.com, helping take your phone orders and other projects that need a hand. Stephanie currently lives in Missouri with her husband, Paul Tallent and is Mom to Amanda and Michael. She spends her time in her kitchen experimenting with the recipes of Nourishing Traditions. The Winter months find her snuggling with her family in front of the fire, sipping a cup of tea with her computer close by.

How To Sprout Grains At Home – Winter 2010 Catalog

How to Sprout Grains at Home

By Peggy Sutton

another sprouted wheat

Many folks have been introduced –or I should say re-introduced– to the goodness and digestibility of sprouted grains and sprouted grain flours. Sprouted grains are not a newfangled food trend but a tried and true traditional means of preparing grains, dating as far back as biblical times and as recent as the industrial revolution.

Until modern farm equipment was invented to gather grains out of the field quickly for shipment to cities and large storage facilities, grains were cut and stored in teh fields until time to use or sell them. While the grains awaited use, the dew and rain would naturally sprout the head of grain. The result was an organically more healthful grain product.Today, at-home methods of sprouting grains before baking entails just a few easy steps and not very much time–and the benefits are worth every minute of the process.

Here’s what sprouting accomplishes:

  1. ~ Sprouting neutralizes phytic acid, a substance present in the bran of all grains that inhibits absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, and zinc.
  2. ~ Sprouting neutralizes enzyme inhibitors present in all seeds.
  3. ~ Sprouting produces enzymes.
  4. ~ Sprouting breaks down the starches in grains into simple sugars so the body can digest them like a vegetable (e.g., a tomato, not a potato).
  5. ~ Sprouting produces vitamin C
  6. ~ Sprouting increases the grains’ carotene and vitamin B content.

So let’s get started!

The equipment for your sprouting operation is not elaborate, but each item is important. This is what you’ll need:

  1. 1. 4 to 8 1-quart mason jars with large-mouth lids;
  2. 2. 1 plastic needlepoint grid, 7-mesh size (available at WalMart or craft store)
  3. 3. 1 or 2 large round bowls, big enough to place 4 of your mason jars in an upright position;
  4. 4. A large colander and small strainer;
  5. 5. 1/4 cup organic cider vinegar;
  6. 6. 6 to 11 cups of; organic grains (For breads, cookies, pastries, try wheat or spelt. For sour dough starter, try rye.)
  7. 7. Filtered water.

Before setting up the actual sprouting, wash and sanitize your grains. Although not absolutely essential, I strongly recommend it. Grit often adheres to your grains, and you never know what kinds of “critters” walked through the field where your grains were harvested.

So here’s the washing process:

  1. 1. Fill your kitchen sink with room-temperature tap water.
  2. 2. Pour your grains into the water, and agitate them thoroughly for a minute or two.
  3. 3. Using a colander, scoop up all the grains you can. Then use the small strainer and your free hand to scoop the remaining grains into the colander. If you have a strainer that fits into your sink drain, it will work great to get the remaining grains and drain the water at the same time. Hold the grain-filled colander under the tap for a quick rinse.
  4. 4. Clean your sink thoroughly of all grit and fill with 2 gallons of tap water. Stir in 1/4 cup of organic cider vinegar.
  5. 5. Dump your washed grains into the vinegar solution and let stand for 7 to 10 minutes.
  6. 6. Repeat Step #3.

Now your grains have been properly washed and sanitized, and it’s time to begin the sprouting process.

  1. 1. Place about 1 1/3 cups of clean grains into each mason jar (if you’re baking only 1 large loaf of bread you will only need 4 jars).
  2. 2. Fill each jar with filtered water (the grains will sit on the bottom of the jar).
  3. 3. Place mesh lids* and screw-tops onto each jar and tighten well. Let jars sit on your counter for 4 hours. The ideal temperature for fast, even sprouting is 69 to 72 degrees F. You may need to place in your pantry or laundry room to maintain an even temperature.
  4. 4. After your grains have soaked for 4 hours (it won’t hurt if they soak for 5 or 6 hours, so don’t worry if you’re busy and can’t get back to them after just 4), hold each jar over your kitchen sink and turn upside down, letting all the water drain out.
  5. 5. Turn each jar right-side up and fill with tap water. Then turn them over again and let all the water drain out of the jar.
  6. 6. Once you’ve completed steps 4 and 5 for each jar of grains, place your jars in a large bowl at a slant with the meshed lids toward the bottom of the bowl. This will allow more water to drain off the grains as they sprout. Place the bowl on your counter and leave overnight.
  7. 7. If you are completing step 6 by early afternoon, then repeat steps 5 and 6 in the evening, and leave jars in the bowl to sprout overnight.
  8. 8. By mid-morning your grains should be sprouted. You are looking for a distinct white tail on the end of the grains. Usually sprouts begin with a 2-pronged antenna protruding from the end of each grain. (NOTE: Do not let your sprouts grow beyond 1/4 inch in length, or your grains will take on a “grassy” taste and will be hard to feed into your mill or grinder once dried.)

You’re almost finished! Now it’s time to dry your sprouts.

sprouted pre-dried

  1. 1. Remove the sprouted grains from each jar and spread onto parchment-lined baking sheets (with sides) or place onto racks in your dehydrator (set at 105 to 110 degrees, and let grains dry thoroughly).
  2. 2. If you’re using your kitchen oven, place pans onto racks and set oven at its lowest temperature. If that temperature is above 110 degrees, prop your oven door open about 1 inch at the top using a wooden spoon or dowel. Let grains dry thoroughly. This will take several hours or overnight. (NOTE: Most new ovens, since about 2000, have built-in dehydrators. Check your owner’s manual to see if you have one–it took me 3 years to discover mine!)

Store your dried grains in an airtight container in the pantry until you are ready to mill.

Sprouting is not limited only to common flour grains. I find that sprouting beans before making soups, chili, and hummus eliminates bloating and gas after eating them. Try sprouting wild rice, and mill it for gluten-free baking. There are lots of foods you can sprout for better digestibility. Be creative and have fun!

And, of course, if you are not inclined to do your own sprouting, please let us do it for you. Check out To Your Health Sprouted Flour Co. today at http://www.organicsproutedflour.net. Also, we have lots of recipes on our web site to try with the fresh sprouted flour you made on your own. Happy Baking!

*To make meshed lids for your jars: Remove a solid lid from a jar top. Place the lid on the needlepoint grid and using a pen or Sharpie, trace a circle. Repeat this step for each of the jars you will use. Then cut the mesh lids out using scissors, and place one inside each jar’s screw-top instead of the solid lid.

Peggy Sutton is the owner of To Your Health Sprouted Flour Co., online and wholesale supplier of sprouted flour products. She founded the company in 2006 to produce fine baked goods and now specializes in sprouted flours, including wheat, spelt and rye. Peggy lives with her husband, Jeff, in Alabama.