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Rooting Out Dental Problems – Summer 2010 Catalog

Nancy Websternancy_small

Part 1 of this 2-part series (“The Tooth of the Matter”) appeared in the Winter 2010

Beeyoutiful Catalog and emphasized the importance of nutrition in dental health.

“Your old filling cracked, and new decay is under it,” the dentist informed me matter-of-factly. “I have time to fix it right now.”

Five minutes later, with numbing shot in effect, he casually drilled out an aging silver amalgam filling from the back molar which had been bothering me for awhile. Over the sound of the drill, I heard him tell the hygienist, “It’s very close to the pulp. If this doesn’t work, she’ll need a root canal.”

A few weeks later, my tooth still hurt, and it was slowly getting worse. By then, my research gene had kicked into high gear. I knew Weston A. Price, the dentist whose educational foundation teaches the dietary principles of nutrient-dense and properly-prepared foods, had lost a son to a root canal gone bad.

Dr. Price’s information led me to other dental experts who similarly warned about the dangers of root canals. All concluded that the only safe way to handle a dead tooth is removal. Apparently, there is no way to sterilize all side chambers of the three miles of tubules inside a tooth. Antibiotics can’t do it. Bleach can’t do it. Even lasers can’t assure adequate cleansing. In one of Dr. Prices’ experiments, he implanted into 100 rabbits the root canal fragments from a person who had suffered a heart attack, and within a few weeks, every rabbit also experienced cardiac arrest!

Modern DNA research offers additional evidence against this common dental procedure by demonstrating bacterial contamination in 100% of the tested samples of extracted root canals. Bacteria that remain after a root canal mutate once circulation through the tooth (by removal of the pulp) is cut off, and the resulting strain is many times more toxic than otherwise. These bacteria can migrate into gum tissue and from there into the rest of the body, causing autoimmune or life-threatening degenerative diseases, even decades after a root canal is performed.

Pulling for a Better Solution

My smile finally looked decent after two stints with braces, so I was not anxious to introduce a gap by having a tooth pulled. But I didn’t want to have long-term health problems, either.

Hoping for a prettier option, I called several endodontists (root canal specialists) to find out how they sterilized the tooth after removing the dead pulp. They all told me I was misled by an old theory and that thousands of root canals are performed safely every day (60 million per year is the current count). I wanted to believe them, but I didn’t feel peace about it. Meanwhile, my tooth was turning dark.

While many dentists advertise their work as “mercury-free,” their emphasis on dental cosmetics made me worry their worldview was not as radical as mine—especially when a few calls confirmed that they recommend root canals. That’s when I stumbled upon www.drwolfe.com/links.html, a collection of websites for holistic dental associations and member practitioners. On this score, I also wished we lived in California again rather than Tennessee, since the Golden State seems to have holistic dentists in every city. Our closest one, Dr. Ada Frazier, is an hour and half away in Alabama, but my long-term well-being and her services were worth the drive.

Dr. Frazier was trained by Dr. Hal Huggins, a long-time outspoken opponent of mercury amalgams and root canals and author of a newly published article titled “Root Canal Dangers: DNA Studies Confirm Dr. Weston Price’s Century-Old Findings.” You can read it online at www.WestonAPrice.org.

Even though “any dentist” can pull a tooth, by going to Dr. Frazier, I was assured of not only avoiding pressure to have a root canal, but I was also confident the tooth extraction would include an important, if non-traditional, procedure called a cavitation. Cavitation involves grinding off the periodontal ligament which holds the tooth in its socket. Although most dentists and endodontists are taught to leave the ligament in place after an extraction, the remnant tissue provides an incubator for hostile bacteria. This bacteria can produce the same damage to the cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and immune systems as those from a root canal. Dr. Huggins compares omitting this procedure to “delivering a baby and leaving the placenta in the uterus.”

After the deed was done, Dr. Frazier instructed me to swish gently with peroxide and saltwater and to supplement with vitamin C to prevent infection. Fortunately, the hole does not show when I smile, but if the gap were obvious, instead of a tooth implant—which also contains harmful metals—I would consider getting a bridge made from biocompatible materials.

The More, the Mercurier

Neither my visits to the holistic dentist nor my education about the benefits of going to one had yet run their course. I had a few other leaky fillings with decay underneath. Although this news worried our bank account, it excited me, because now I had an excuse to switch out a few of those “silver” (mercury-based) fillings.

A wall in Dr. Frazier’s office displays a poster delineating the body-wide negative effects of mercury—the substance delivered to dental offices, packaged as “hazardous material” and then daily put into thousands of trusting patients’ mouths. Filling material is amalgamized (mixed) either in a combination of 50% mercury and 35% silver plus a bit of tin and copper or as a “copper amalgam” of 66% mercury and 33% copper.

Copper amalgams are highly unstable, releasing fifty times more mercury into the body than even the older combination. Hardly a coincidence, when copper amalgams were first introduced in 1975, the incidence of Lou Gehrig’s Disease and multiple sclerosis jumped dramatically the first year and has grown exponentially since.

Friction from chewing and brushing and heat from hot liquids and foods cause these mercury-based fillings to release harmful vapors, which spread throughout the body via the respiratory system, accumulating mostly in the brain, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. There they destroy good bacteria and encourage Candida growth.

The International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology provides a disturbing YouTube video showing the vapors emitted by these fillings: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ylnQ-T7oiA&feature=related.

Scientists report degenerative changes in the brain within a few days after exposure to mercury vapors. Severe headaches, dizziness, weakness, fatigue, depression, hair loss, memory loss, and even coma can be caused by mercury toxicity. A fascinating bit of history illustrates the point. In the 1800s, hat makers working in poorly ventilated shops breathed in fumes from a mercury solution used to turn fur into felt and became known for their mental and emotional instability. That’s where the saying “mad as a hatter” originated.

Mercury binds to sulfur-containing enzymes, suffocating cells and causing chronic allergic and immune reactions. Kidney and lung damage shows up within months of exposure.

Then there is the phenomenon of “dental galvanism.” When two or more dissimilar metals are used to restore or replace missing teeth, they produce an electric current. This electrification causes the rate of mercury corrosion to increase 10 to 20 times. Many people—including those with metal fillings—worry about the mercury content of nutrient-rich ocean fish, but to put this in perspective: Every day, their fillings give off up to nine times the mercury they might ingest from eating fish!

Detach and De-Tox

Dr. Frazier explained to me the safety protocol for amalgam removal as she and her assistant donned gas masks, protective eyewear, and hair caps. The highest mercury content fillings go first, and when several fillings need to be replaced, removal should take place over several visits so as not to overwhelm the body’s detoxing system.

A special rubber “dam” was placed in my mouth to prevent particles from going down my throat during the procedure. I also wore protective eyewear and was cautioned to breath only through the oxygen mask over my nose. A venting tube much like a clothes dryer hose was drawn close to my mouth while air ionizers whirred nearby. The hygenist maintained a continuous stream of cool water to lessen the vapor-releasing heat of drilling friction, while she held a small vacuum right at the tooth site.

After the procedure, Dr. Frazier encouraged me to drink lots of water, to take extra vitamin C, and to do toxin-removing “oil pulling”—swishing sesame, sunflower, or coconut oil in the mouth for 15 minutes and spitting it out. Dr. Frazier and her assistant, who encounter mercury daily, de-tox themselves routinely, including spending time in a far-infrared sauna. This is a far cry from the casual way the first dentist removed my old filling. No wonder infertility and other health problems are worse for dental hygenists!

If you suspect symptoms of heavy metal toxicity or even after a cleaning or any dental work, you can do a lot of chelation (pronounced “kee-lay-shun”) on your own. Chelation uses natural substances to attract heavy metal particles and pull them out of the body. Beeyoutiful offers an array of excellent supplements that can help:

Pure Chlorella

Odorless Garlic

Selenium Secure

Rosehip C and Gentle Cbone_ami_mineral_magnesium

In the process, be sure to drink lots of pure water and keep your bowels empty, because a majority of the toxins are eliminated in the bathroom.

Following a nutrient-dense, properly prepared diet as described in the Nourishing Traditions cookbook and taking healthy supplements will help prevent problems in the first place, as we discussed in part 1 of this series. If you still have health issues, though,NourishingTrad_1 the idea of removing fillings can be emotionally and financially daunting. To help reduce the financial pain, you might consider saving up to have one filling done at a time (it’s healthier this way, too). And put yourself on a chelation regime.

If you ask most traditional dentists about root canal and mercury concerns, they will scowl and say something about contrarian “quacks.” Taking action, though, is important because the vapor cloud from mercury fillings has no silver lining.

Nancy Webster is a freelance writer and homeschool mother of eight. After enduring multiple tooth extractions, two sets of braces, and a dozen fillings through the years, she is a highly motivated researcher on alternative dental practices. Nancy is also the founder and facilitator of the Southern Middle Tennessee chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation.

The Tooth of the Matter – Spring 2010 Catalog

The Tooth of the Matter

Re-thinking All You’ve Ever Heard about Dental Health

[First of a 2-part series]

Nancy Webster

Part 2- Rooting Out Dental Problems- Summer 2010

nancy_small

When my husband and I first encountered the notion of letting God plan our family size 23 years ago, my biggest hesitation, oddly enough, was worry about not being able to afford braces and dental care for a family with “too many kids.” Eight children later, I realize the tooth concerns were real but the solutions are far different than I would have expected early-on in our family life.

The Whole Tooth

If you’ve seen Alex Haley’s classic TV mini-series Roots, you may recall from one of the early episodes that, it was not only the slave’s physique that was examined, but also their teeth. It was commonly known that the teeth provided a snapshot of the person’s overall state of health.

My holistic dentist (more about her in part 2 of this series) recently told me about a researcher who examined the teeth of people who had died from cancer. Without being told beforehand, he identified what type cancer they had succumbed to just from information he found in their teeth!

One of my heroes is yet another dentist, Dr. Weston A. Price, who, in the 1930’s, studied the teeth of people groups all over the world. In his landmark book, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, he documented that eating nutrient-dense, properly prepared foods and avoiding processed, denatured foods results in healthy mouths with plenty of room for all 32, cavity-free teeth. Not only that, he noted that such eating patterns were the secret to healthy pregnancies and birthing of strong babies. Nutrient-dense eating kept subjects remarkably free from intellectual and emotional disabilities as well. Dr. Price further demonstrated that this excellent dental and bodily health will degenerate into crowded, diseased teeth and gums, as well as other health problems in just one generation if parents consuming processed white flour, sugar, trans fats, and other de-based foods before conception and, for the mom, during pregnancy and lactation.

I wish I’d known about Weston Price before we started our family. Instead, I was addicted to chocolate chip cookies made with cheap, toxic margarine, white sugar, and white flour. As we kept having babies, I knew my cookie habit was bad for me, but candida kept me addicted. To make matters worse, in my quest for good health, I dabbled in vegetarianism, throwing off my hormones with soy products and omitting the essential animal proteins and fats my babies needed. Consequently, many of our children are prospects for traditional orthodontics because of high, narrow palates and crowded teeth just like those “second generation” subjects Dr. Price studied. But thanks to Dr. Price, I believe there is yet another better way.

Straightening Teeth Gracefully, Not Forcefully

That we haven’t had dental insurance to make braces affordable may be one of our great blessings in disguise. According to the Fall 2009 Weston A. Price Foundation magazine Wise Traditions (available from www.westonaprice.org), correcting malocclusions-crooked teeth and bad bite-benefits more than just looks. It also can reduce problems with insomnia and sleep apnea, difficulty in swallowing, tension headaches, chronic neck and back pain, TMJ, and even cognitive, behavioral, or other neuro-psychiatric symptoms-including those on the autism spectrum, OCD, and Down and Tourette syndromes. But the traditional orthodontic process-extracting four bicuspids and forcing with brackets and headgear the other teeth and facial bones to move into place-is not the best route to achieve pleasing facial proportions and well-aligned teeth.

Functional orthodontics are a better option to alleviate the crowding and jawbone underdevelopment caused by faulty pre-natal, infant, and childhood nutrition. Wise Traditions notes, “This method rarely calls for extractions; instead, the dentist applies oral appliances or splints, to assist Mother Nature and encourage the growth of underdeveloped dental arches. Over time, these functional appliances gently move and expand the upper and lower dental arches, allowing the teeth and bones to grow according to-or at least more closely approximating-the original genetic blueprint of development.”

A few methods for widening the dental arch include Advanced Lightwire Functional (see http://www.drfarid.com/alternative.html for a description), Crozat (http://www.crozatdoc.com/faq.html), and SOMA (http://www.curetoothdecay.com/Cure_Tooth_Decay_img/SOMA.pdf). Although superior, this functional process is not nearly as common as regular orthodontics, so you may need to travel and pay extra for it. If you hope babies are in your future, though, I’d suggest spending your travel time and money seeking out raw milk, grass-fed meats, lacto-fermented vegetables and the like now, so you may not have to find orthodontic care later. If you eat as described in Sally Fallon’s information-packed, Weston A. Price-friendly book Nourishing Traditions before conception of your babies and afterward, you’ll quite possibly have little or no dental caries (cavities) or gum diseases bothering you and yours.

Even if your family is suffering from active decay, there is something you can do about it from home. In Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, Dr. Price describes case after case of using nutrition to reverse serious decay in children-often within three to five months. While the cavities (holes in the teeth) never go away, teeth generate what’s called “secondary dentin,” a hard substance which grows over the cavities so they can heal, keeping teeth alive, healthy, and strong.

Truth Decay

Ramiel Nagel, in his book Cure Tooth Decay: Heal and Prevent Cavities with Nutrition, describes how teeth work and offers a nutrition protocol much like Dr. Price’s to reverse dental caries and gum disease (see www.CureToothDecay.com). He points out the flawed explanation for tooth decay presented by the American Dental Association and taught by most of today’s dentists. They wrongly attribute tooth decay to bacteria that eat foods left on the teeth, thus producing acid which erodes the physical structure of the teeth. Supposedly, when this bacteria eludes regular home cleaning, then fillings, root canals, extractions, and false teeth follow.

Some legitimate questions arise, however, upon examining this traditional model. If the ADA’s explanation is true, why did the Swiss living in the Alps, isolated from modern foods and clueless about toothbrushes and floss, have no cavities (or crowded teeth)? Dr. Price found people groups eating native diets from the Outer Hebrides off the coast of Scotland to the aborigines of Australia-all with healthy, never-brushed teeth. While brushing may have removed the mossy scum Dr. Price observed on their teeth, there was no tooth decay, a result attributable only to nutrition.

The truth of how nutrition affects dental health lies in the dental structure itself. Tooth dentin consists of miles of tiny tubules. Under healthy, well-nourished conditions, there is a constant flow of microscopic fluids running from the intestinal area through the tooth pulp, out the dentin, into the enamel, and out through the mouth. This flushes the tooth, keeping the internal structures clean and free of contaminants from the mouth. If body chemistry gets out of balance, however, this flow is reversed, pulling bacteria, acids, and other toxic matter from the mouth into the tooth. The pulp becomes inflamed, and if the proper flow pattern is not restored, disease spreads to the enamel. So cavities actually happen from the inside out, not from harmful substances collecting outside and “drilling into” the teeth.

Diet, environmental toxins, and stress upset the balance of the glandular system, so glands do not secrete hormones in amounts that properly regulate bodily processes. Nagel cites research by the late Melvin Page, a dentist who during 30 years of research ran more than 40,000 blood tests on patients to identify the biochemical cause of tooth decay and gum disease. He found that a disturbance in the ratio of calcium to phosphorus, in particular, is responsible.

In Your Body Is Your Best Doctor, Page explains that when the amounts of calcium or phosphorus in the blood “are not in the exact proportion of 2.5 parts calcium to one part phosphorus, minerals are withdrawn from the dentin and bone, resulting in tooth decay. It takes a continued low level of phosphorus, over a period of several months, to deplete the dentin of its mineral structure.” Interestingly, this corresponds to Dr. Price’s observation that people with 100-percent immunity to tooth decay ate foods high in phosphorus.

Extract Your Rotten Diet

The starting point in improving nutrition for dental health is avoiding the bad stuff. Biggies to spurn are sugars of all types (not because of what they leave on the outside of your teeth but because of what they do to body chemistry), even the “healthy” alternatives like xylitol and agave syrup. Other problem items to limit include flour and grain products (unless made from freshly ground, fermented grains), hydrogenated oils, low quality vegetable oils like canola, pasteurized dairy products, excess salt, junk foods, coffee, soft drinks, soy milk and protein powders, foods with nitrates and nitrites, addictive substances, and non-organic foods.

Although blood sugar spikes from fruit are not as severe as from white sugar, Nagel warns against over-consumption of fruit because even it will alter blood sugar levels, changing the calcium and phosphorus ratio and increasing the chance for decay. If blood sugar is changed for prolonged and consistent periods, this will eventually become the body’s new “normal,” leading to glandular imbalance and tooth decay.

If you don’t make the shift to a nutrient-dense diet, you’ll become chums with your dentist, especially as you slip past 40 years old when some 46% of all teeth of people in this age group have been affected by decay. Even if you’re younger-especially pregnant or nursing-it’s important to eat according to this protocol, both so your baby will have good tooth structure and facial development, and so your own bones and teeth will not lose minerals from the hormonal stress of growing a baby.

If you’re just now switching your family from eating the standard American diet (SAD) of processed foods, these new tooth do’s and don’ts may overwhelm you to the point of giving up. But let me point out that retreating to the standard procedure of making an appointment with the dentist for yet another filling may be easier in the short-run, but in the long run, you’re in for lots of avoidable costly and painful procedures and potentially lost teeth. I admit our family does not perfectly adhere to Nagel’s tooth healing protocol, but we do have direction and hope that cavity-free teeth can be ours.

[In the Spring 2010 Beeyoutiful catalog, Part 2 will offer help in choosing a dentist for those times tooth decay gets ahead of you, including information about the dangers of root canals and the need for proper mercury amalgam removal procedures and detoxification.]

Nancy Webster is a freelance writer and homeschool mother of eight. After enduring multiple tooth extractions, two sets of braces, and a dozen fillings through the years, she is a highly motivated researcher on alternative dental practices. Nancy is also the founder and facilitator of the Southern Middle Tennessee chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation.

SIDEBAR:

Fix-It Formulas

(1) Eat Right. From the work of doctors Price and Page, Ramiel Nagel (see accompanying article) compiled a dietary protocol which has a 95% effectiveness rate for helping people prevent, minimize, and even re-mineralize decayed tooth structure. Include as many of these in your diet as possible:

-1/8 to 1/2 t. fermented cod liver oil 2-3x/day with meals (OR 4 T organic liver)

-1/8 to 1/4 t. high vitamin butter oil 2-3x/day with meals (OR 1 to 2 T grass-fed butter per meal)

– 1 to 4 c. raw, grass-fed milk per day with 1 oz. of cream for every 6 oz. of whole milk

– 1 to 2 c. bone broth made from slow cooking bones and organic fish

– 1 to 3 T bone marrow from grass-fed animals

– Fermented vegetables (e.g., sauerkraut) and dairy products (yogurt or kefir) 2x/day

– Seaweed, especially kelp, 1-2x/day

A recommended menu includes raw or lightly cooked fish or grass-fed meats, fish liver or grass-fed liver and other organ meats, raw or lightly cooked oysters or other mollusks, along with lots of fresh, vitamin and mineral-rich vegetables. Coconut, olive, and palm oils along with butter, lard, or tallow should be used. (While Nagel also offers a vegetarian protocol, it does not have the same success rate.)

A good way to move towards the entire tooth healing diet is to make a written plan to learn and master one food preparation method (like lacto-fermentation of vegetables or slow-cooked bone broths) at a time, turning it into a regular part of your routine. Be sure to set dates by which you plan to make each change. You may need to be a little sneaky to get foods like liver into recent SAD eaters. Try grating frozen grass-fed liver (freeze for 14 days before eating to kill possible parasites) and place the raw gratings into capsules using an inexpensive pill maker, available online or likely from your local health food store. Casseroles, smoothies, and soup are wonderful ways to disguise “yucky” foods as well. For older children and unenthusiastic spouses, a few educational discussions may help them join your tooth-healing, health-building team.

(2) Brush Right. Touted as cavity-fighting, the toothpastes we all grew up with contain not only fluoride-which is poisonous-but also glycerin, which requires something like 27 rinses to remove it from the teeth. Otherwise, it can create a barrier that keeps teeth from getting harder and stronger. Even if you are careful not to swallow toothpaste, some will diffuse through your gums directly into your bloodstream. Healthier, fluoride-free alternatives complete with essential oils are nice, but they can be expensive.

For a less costly alternative, brush with a mix of 2 T baking soda (be sure it consists only of pure sodium bicarbonate), 1 t. finely ground sea salt, and 5-10 drops of peppermint essential oil. Or you can moisten 2 T baking soda with a bit of hydrogen peroxide. This will also help whiten teeth without toxic chemicals to do the job. Brushing your teeth occasionally with activated charcoal is another natural whitener (beware that after charcoal brushing, you’ll need to re-brush to remove the unsightly black grit from your teeth).

Xylitol- Summer 2007 Catalog

by Nancy Brillaut

From the time we are young children, we are taught to brush our teeth, planting the seeds for good dental hygiene. Good brushing and flossing and restricted sugar consumption can reduce the occurrence of cavities, yet they still remain common. A National Institute of Health survey shows nearly 20% of children, ages 2-4, have already experienced cavities; more than 67% of adults aged 35-44 have lost at least one permanent tooth due to dental cavities, and 25% of people 65-74 have lost all of their natural teeth! Here’s what is going on.smiles1

Tooth decay is a bacterial disease. The bacterium, streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), is one of many millions of bacteria living in our mouths. Most of these bacteria are harmless, some even beneficial. However, S. mutans is the culprit causing tooth decay by feeding on sugars in our mouth. Simple carbohydrates are fermented by S. mutans into lactic acid. Lactic acid increases acidity in the mouth, initiating the process of dissolving tooth enamel, also referred to as de-mineralization. This is a simplistic explanation of tooth decay; however, this article is not meant to be a chemistry lesson, but rather an introduction to a wonderful sugar substitute called Xylitol.

What is Xylitol you ask? Xylitol is a natural sugar, sometimes called wood sugar or birch sugar. It can be extracted from birch wood, raspberries, plums and other fruits, corn, seed hulls, and nutshells. Xylitol is a 5-carbon structure and, unlike the 6-carbon structure of sucrose, is not a substance on which bacteria can grow. In fact, Xylitol may inhibit S. mutans and other bacterial enzymes and actually interfere with the metabolism of other sugars found in the mouth.

So, what does all this chemistry babble mean to us in terms of our dental hygiene and general health? Xylitol is actually a “tooth-friendly” sugar substitute. Xylitol not only discourages tooth decay, but may actively help repair small cavities. Recent research suggests Xylitol attracts and then starves harmful bacteria, allowing remineralization of damaged teeth. Xylitol is not a sugar, so there is no sugar rush, or crash. Twenty-five years of scientific research, mostly on children, has shown that regular use of Xylitol over a period of time reduces the incidence of cavities. There are many studies, the majority conducted in “developing” countries like Belize, Hungary, and Costa Rica, where routine dental care is limited at best, and the results are consistent; the incidence of dental cavities is reduced by large percentages, in some cases as much as 75%. Most research tested gums and candies (mints) containing Xylitol, since the delivery systems that produced the best anti-cavity results were those permitting direct contact with the teeth for the longest time.

Xylitol is also available in toothpastes, mouthwashes, chewable supplements and breath sprays. How much should we use? Studies show using 4-12 grams per day is most effective. If a piece of gum contains 1 gram, chew a minimum of four pieces per day. Given the safety of this product, this is one case where “more is better.” Remarkably, it appears that regular use of Xylitol for a period of time (2 years in the study of children in Belize), provides lasting protection against cavities. These children were examined five years later and the Xylitol group had an average of only 1.5 new cavities, compared to 4 new cavities in the control group.

Another study indicated that regular intake of Xylitol by mom while baby is in the womb, provides lifelong protection for baby. New clinical evidence appears regularly about this safe sugar substitute. Other benefits include prevention of childhood ear infections, lower risk of Type II Diabetes due to the slower absorption of this sugar into the blood, and reduction of subsequent insulin response. A Finnish study has shown improved bone density.

Apparently Xylitol is here to stay. Children who begin chewing Xylitol gum about a year before their permanent teeth erupt may avoid a lifetime of painful visits to the dentist. In fact, one dentist was reported as saying that regular use of Xylitol in the American diet, could put dentists out of business. Time to change our diets people!

Nancy Brillault is a clinically certified herbalist, certified aromatherapist and practicing wellness consultant in Santa Fe, New Mexico.