Tag Archives: beauty

Makeup Monday: The “No-Makeup” Makeup Look

The No-Makeup Makeup Look from BeeyoutifulSkin.com

I confess: I am a makeup junkie. I love going all out and doing a fab smoky eye, or a bright lip, or a glam metallic look… but there are some (many!) days when I was up half the night, am on my third cup of coffee, and time’s ticking.

5There’s nothing “important,” per se, on the schedule, I really just need to look not tired, knowhatimean? Or maybe I’m going to the gym and don’t need much, just a little perk. Then there are the times when I don’t want to look like I’m trying too hard, like say… volunteering for Neighborhood Clean-Up Day or taking the kids to the park.

Enter the “no makeup” makeup look.

It’s pretty minimalistic; just covering the dark circles, lending a glow to your skin, and barely enhancing your flirty bits (eyes + lips).

Start by cleansing and moisturizing your face (always!). Then dash on some foundation with our large kabuki brush; it covers a lot of ground at once, so you can do your whole face in about 30 seconds. Then I always dab on my foundation a little more under my eyes with the Flat Brush to get heavier coverage where it’s needed. Goodbye, dark circles!

Next, take black eyeliner (or brown, if you’re blonde) and, using an angled eyeliner brush, “tightline” your upper lids. This means you pull up on your upper eyelid a bit and put the color right on that bit of lid that rims your eyeball (called the waterline). It’s odd at first, and kinda tickles. But once you get used to it, it’s really no big deal.

I leave the lower waterline bare, but the color usually transfers a bit anyway, which I don’t mind. I prefer tightlining for this look rather than a traditional eyeliner application (on the lid above the lash line) because it doesn’t LOOK like you have eyeliner on, but it still adds fullness to your lash line. It’s like magic, really.

The No-Makeup Makeup Look from BeeyoutifulSkin.comThen using Champagne Pearl eyeshadow and our Large All-Over Eyeshadow Brush, stamp a bit of shadow all over your lids, brow to lashes. It gives just the right amount of brightness and shimmer without looking either chalky-flat or overly sparkly. Pay attention to the inner corners of your eyes (near the bridge of your nose) because it tends to get dark when you’re burning the midnight oil. (Pro tip: stamp, don’t sweep your shadow on; it will go on more opaque and last longer.)

If you like, use the Angled Eyeliner brush and your liner of choice to do double-duty on your brows. (Most of us need to fill our brows. At least a little.)

Now sweep some blush right on the apples of your cheeks. Smile… the part that chubs up a bit? That’s the apple. I’m currently crushing on our Pinky Pink blush; I love the bright sheer wash of color for springtime.

Curl your lashes. I like to warm my curler a bit by running it under hot water right before I use it. Longer lasting curl that way! Then layer on your mascara. (Note: We currently do not carry a mascara because we are still working on the perfect formulation that both performs well AND meets our stringent purity guidelines.)

A dash of our lightly-colored Lip Shimmer finishes things off! Kiss Of Ruby is perfect for my coloring.

That’s it, you guys. This whole process takes me maybe 3 minutes? Seriously, less time than it took you to read this step-by-step guide. And then I feel awake and ready to tackle my day. After one more cup of coffee, that is…!

Makeup Monday: Contouring 101

Makeup Monday: Contouring 101 from BeeyoutifulSkin

Contouring with makeup. Sounds like an intimidating professional technique that makeup artists use on models and Hollywood actors, doesn’t it? At least that’s what I thought when I first heard about the technique that is sweeping through the makeup industry. It sounds advanced, but it’s not all that difficult once you understand two simple principles:Makeup Monday: Contouring 101 from BeeyoutifulSkin

Dark recedes. 

Light brings forward. 

Ask any woman what color is most slimming and 99 out of 100 will automatically answer “black”. We’ve heard of the miraculous slimming abilities of dark colors in clothing, but did you realize that makeup has the same effect? Specifically, darker makeup gives the illusion of making a facial feature look smaller. That’s principle number one.

Secondly, light colors make an object look larger (sadly, this is why I own exactly ZERO white pants). In makeup terms, that means lighter foundation or eyeshadow has the ability of making the area it’s applied to appear larger, visually bringing it to the foreground. Enter principle number two.

Now that you are armed with this technical knowledge, you can apply these principles to your face using slightly lighter and slightly darker products than your skin, and miracles can happen. If you have a round face shape (like I do), contouring can help create higher cheekbones and a less… cherubic appearance, shall we say? If you have a double chin, darker makeup can make it recede into oblivion. If you have a broad forehead, a few expertly-placed swipes of dark makeup can make it less one-dimensional.

Now, before I go any further let me just say that there is probably a third principle that you must keep in mind: the power of blending. If you apply darker makeup and do not blend well, you can end up just looking like you have dirt on your face. Or something went horribly wrong at the spray tanning salon. Either way, not cute. Blend, ladies; blend!

So let’s talk specifics and get into some simple step-by-steps to basic face contouring.

Start by cleansing and moisturizing your face. Always, always apply makeup to a fresh canvas; your makeup will go on more evenly and perform better than if you apply it on dirty or oily skin. Now get out your contouring makeup.

  • Your usual foundation
  • Matte bronzer, or a foundation in a deeper shade than you usually use. General rule of thumb is to go about two shades darker than your skin.
  • Highlighter
  • Blush

(I’m using our Warm Bronzer, Pinky Pink blush, and our Champagne Pearl eyeshadow as my highlighter.)

The tools I’m using are a foundation brush, a blush brush (found in our seven-piece brush set), a mini foundation brush, a flat brush, and my good old-fashioned fingers.

Alright, let’s dig in.

First, apply your usual foundation all over your face, as you usually do. (Have you seen our tutorial of the various methods of applying mineral foundation? If not, stop now and watch that first to get the best application possible.) We’re creating the even, smooth, creamy backdrop upon which our magic will shine.

Time for Principle Number One: Dark Recedes.

Beak out your dark color and the small brush. Take a look at your face and notice your ears… see that little nub on the inside nearest your cheek? It’s called the tragus. That’s where you want to start with your dark contour. Suck in your cheeks and aim from the tragus toward the hollow, using downward strokes and lighter pressure as you go. Don’t be shy; at this stage you want to SEE that color on there. We’ll blend it later.

At this point you can also put some contour on the outside corners of your forehead; this will narrow a broad forehead. Sweep some on on your neck right underneath your jawline, which will sharpen your jaw and recede any double chin you may have. If you have a wide nose, run a little along each side of your nose. You can even dab a little under your lower lip to give the illusion of a fuller lower lip. Pout: perfected!

Next step: BLEND. This is important. Do not skip this. Do not pass go, do not collect two hundred dollars. The last thing you want are racing stripes running down the sides of your face. Rather, you want everything to look like “maybe she was born with it, maybe it’s Maybelline”, you know? So break out the fluffy powder brush (no powder necessary) and give it a good swirl over everywhere you applied the contour, just barely blurring the lines, leaving the shadowy illusion of depth where you applied the dark makeup.

Now it’s time to use Principle Number Two: Light Brings Forward. 

Grab your shimmery, light colored makeup (I’m using our eyeshadow in Champagne Pearl; it’s not just for eyes only!) and a flat brush. You can use a large one like our Flat Brush, or a smaller one like our Large All-Over eyeshadow brush. Or you can even use your fingers! Dip your instrument of choice into your light makeup and dab it onto the tops of your cheekbones, almost into the eye socket, but not quite. You can also run it down the length of your nose, dab it in the cupid’s bow of your upper lip, and touch it along your browbones. These areas will now subtly catch the light, bringing them forward visually, and making your skin glow.

Lastly, apply blush to the apples of your cheeks and you’re all set. (What are the apples, you say? The part of your cheek that chubs up a bit when you smile. It’s cute.)

That’s it. You’re contoured, baby! It sounds slightly more complicated and advanced than just using foundation and calling it a day, but once you get the hang of it, it takes about a minute, tops. It’s not supposed to be a dramatic difference, but one of those things where people will wonder what’s different. (Did she lose weight? is it her haircut/color? There’s something subtly different…!)

Have you used these two principles of light and dark to enhance your own natural beauty? We’d love to hear your feedback! 

Makeup Monday: 3 Mineral Foundation Application Techniques, Plus Concealer Tips

BeeyoutifulSkin.com mineral foundation application techniques

BeeyoutifulSkin.com mineral foundation application techniquesNow that you’ve discovered a foundation shade to match your skin tone, let’s talk about actually wearing your new makeup. Did you know that there are several ways to apply BeeyoutifulSkin’s mineral foundation? Most people who have used mineral makeup before are familiar with the classic dry buff method, but there are a couple of other techniques that will give you different results. Try them all out to find out which one works best for you!

Dry Buff Method

This is the classic approach to applying mineral foundation, and for good reason: it’s quick and simple, easy to master, and you can customize the amount of coverage you get by varying your brush pressure and amount of product used, giving a soft, glowing finish to your skin.

To begin, cleanse and moisturize your skin as usual. (This step is important to do before applying makeup; it eliminates excess oils and “daily dust”, and preps your skin to be the best canvas for makeup to adhere to.) Tap out a bit of foundation into the lid, and swirl your foundation brush around, being sure to get the makeup worked up into the bristles. Tap off any excess foundation back into the lid.

Then, using medium pressure and circular strokes, buff the foundation into your skin. I like to start at the forehead and work my way down, finishing by blending the jawline into the neck. The key here is the circular motion and consistent pressure. This will give you actual coverage, as opposed to just dusting it on like you would a traditional setting powder. Finish your foundation with a spritz of our Laveshmint Hydrating Toner, if you like.

“Air-brush” Method

This technique will give you an even, smooth finish with full coverage, requires a bit more buffing than the dry method, but the super soft, “perfect” look is well worth it. This is currently my favorite way to apply my foundation.

Again, start with a freshly cleansed and moisturized face, then mist our Laveshmint Hydrating Toner on your skin. Tap out a bit of foundation into your lid, then mist your foundation brush with the toner as well before swirling it in the makeup. What you’re going for here is not a sopping wet brush, but a fine mist that will mix with the foundation on the brush, coating the bristles lightly.

Working quickly, buff the moist foundation into your skin, being sure to buff until dry, paying close attention to blending well at the hairline and jawline. I like to add a final dash of Laveshmint Hydrating Toner once I’m done; it acts as a setting mist, and also moisturizes your skin right through the makeup. (Pro tip: carry it in your handbag in the summer to spritz on your face and neck! The cool of the peppermint oil will refresh you and keep your skin moist in dry, hot weather.)

Liquid Method

I recommend this application if you have dry skin (like me!) or simply prefer the familiarity of liquid foundation. You have complete control over how much coverage you achieve, from tinted moisturizer (lightest) to thick, rich cream (fullest) because you are mixing it yourself. If you struggle with dryness, sometimes mineral makeup can enhance that tight feeling, and leave you less-than-glowing… but by using the liquid method you moisturize and cover at the same time.

To start, cleanse and moisturize your face (yep, I’m going to say that every time; it’s that important). Then in your foundation lid, or on a saucer if you prefer, mix a dollop of your favorite moisturizer (I love our Laveshmint Moisturizer!) with just a sprinkle of foundation powder. Experiment with ratios to come up with the coverage that’s just right for you.

To apply, you can either use your fingers, a makeup sponge, or for the best coverage and professional finish, I like to use our flat brush. Be sure to blend well, especially around the hair and jaw lines; this technique is the least forgiving if you don’t blend, blend, blend!  You might like to dust on a light, dry coat of foundation if you want a matte finish, or if you’re going for a more dewy look, go without. Again, you can spritz on some of our Laveshmint Toner for staying power and extra hydration.

Concealer

Lastly, let’s talk about concealer. You’ll notice we don’t offer a separate product to cover blemishes and dark circles… why is that, you ask? Well, unlike most mineral makeup, our foundation is made without fillers, thus it’s a very concentrated product, already at (or above!) the pigment levels of most mineral concealers. Truly, a little goes a long way when used as a foundation.

Our foundation powder will also perform well as a concealer with the right brush, using any of the above methods. You can use our Large Flat Brush to conceal dark under-eye circles, the Pointed Sculptor Brush works particularly well with the dry buff method and the airbrush method, or try the Large All-Over Brush with the liquid or dry buff methods. Be sure to blend the concealer-covered areas seamlessly with the rest of your foundation for even, flawless, glowing skin.

Goat Milk Soap, Great for your Skin- Winter 2006-2007 Catalog

By Arielle Hebert

 

Some years ago, a friend gave me a bar of her own goat milk soap. Prior to using this soap, I often battled extremely dry, cracked hands. After faithfully using my friend’s goat milk soap, I was amazed at its effectiveness. My hands no longer dried out and cracked! My skin became soft and moist. I was so impressed that I even began using the soap as a wash on one of my does (mama goat) who has a super sensitive udder, and she appreciated it as much as I!

So, I experimented with making my own goat milk soap, using milk from my herd of dairy goats. Over the years, my knowledge and understanding of soap making grew and my soap formula improved. My family and I found it to be so much better than commercial soap. I began my own cottage industry to share this great treasure with others.FacialBarLarge1_1

 

So, What makes it so Great?

Goat milk is rejuvenating, anti-inflammatory, and moisturizing. It contains over fifty nutrients including the vitamins A, B1, B2 (riboflavin), B6, B12, C, D, E, and K, niacin, zinc, and calcium, as well as some minerals, amino acids, citric acid, unsaturated fatty acid, proteins, various enzymes and many other nutrients. These are all part of what makes goat milk soap so special. Vitamin A slows the effects of aging and prevents brown spots. Zinc contributes to the re-construction of collagen fibers, resulting in firmer, smoother skin. Zinc also encourages moisture retention and assists in maintaining your skin’s elasticity. Calcium tones and smoothes the skin. Since goat milk is naturally homogenized (the milk and cream do not separate), the natural fat provides the skin with a rich, moisturizing effect. The oils in goat milk are easily absorbed by the skin, resulting in a healthy balance of oils for dry or oily skin.

Goat milk also contains alpha-hydroxy acids. These acids, which occur naturally in the milk, are known to plump the skin and smooth fine lines. Alpha-hydroxy acids also exfoliate by breaking down the glue holding those dead skins cells together. Additionally, these acids neutralize free radicals, slowing the aging process and refreshing the skin. Caprylic acid is a fatty acid contained in goat milk that reduces alkalinity, giving goat milk soap a pH level very close to that of the skin. This prevents the soap from stripping away the natural oils of the skin. The natural oils of the skin form a protective barrier that keep microbials out.

Goat milk soap cleanses while leaving that protective barrier intact, and soothes the surface tension of the skin, allowing it to be moisturized and absorb the healthy nutrients. Th e other fatty acids present in goat milk are also natural antimicrobials and anti-fungals. My soaps also contain: Olive oil, which moisturizes and forms a protective film on the skin without inhibiting the skin’s normal, necessary functions, and is a good cleanser. Vitamin E oil is an antioxidant, and a natural preservative. Coconut oil is a moisturizer, but it also makes the soap hard (unlike many other handmade soaps), but with a generous lather, and it resists rancidity. Palm oil is a gentle cleanser. Lastly, there is lye. Lye is a cleanser with a long, long history. In the proper amounts it provides great cleansing but is still gentle. It is great for getting rid of chiggers and is said to soothe bug bites.

Why is Handmade Soap
Superior to Commercially Manufactured Soap?

Natural glycerin is produced during the process of soap making. This glycerin is highly valued for its moisturizing properties and its ability to help your skin retain moisture. Commercial soap producers remove the glycerin from their soap in order to use it in more expensive products, like moisturizers. Of course you need a moisturizer after using most commercial soaps. My hand-made soap is completely natural, right down to the essential oils with which it is scented. Essential oils are powerful aromatic substances extracted from flowers and herbs that contribute their own beneficial properties to each bar of soap, delivering more health and vitality to your skin! Commercial soap often contains chemical additives and synthetic ingredients including synthetic fragrances and dyes which can be irritating and drying to skin.

My handmade goat milk soap (Rehoboth Farm Goat Milk Soap) is produced in small batches in which the quality of the soap and the ingredients can be closely monitored. The same care and caution is not likely to be exercised when soap is mass produced. The skin-nutritious oils in my soaps are each carefully selected and combined based on how they compliment the properties of the goat milk and achieve a rich, moisturizing, hard bar of soap, with great lather. When goat milk is combined with a carefully selected blend of oils in a handmade soap, the result is a mild, skin-nutritious, luxurious bar that thoroughly cleanses, refreshes, smoothes, and moisturizes and is so gentle it can be used on infants. Doesn’t it make sense to treat your skin well by using goat milk soap?

Beeyoutiful Products mentioned in this article:

Taking a Shine to Your Hair- Summer 2007 Catalog

by Nancy Websternancy_small

I always assumed I’d have a baby girl first. It seemed the natural thing because I didn’t have much background in boys. My only sibling was a sister. I went to an all-girls’ high school, and all of my dolls were female (never had a Ken). But as standard baby-having procedure dictates, I didn’t get to choose. My first two were boys-all boys, I might add. From their early books, I learned what to call any piece of construction equipment ever invented and the names of every dinosaur yet discovered. I controlled my inclination to heart failure when the boys climbed too high in a tree or picked up a snake. And it was actually fun. Still, I hoped for a girl to dress in ribbons and bows, someone to be a cooking soul mate and a baby lover. So when our third bundle of joy came along and the doctor proclaimed, “It’s a girl!” I literally did not believe him at first.

Precious Anna wore the mandated pink ruffles but ripped out every hair barrette or bow until she was four years old. I became well-practiced in daughter maintenance, though, since she was the first of five girls in a row! The bathroom drawers bulged with brushes and ribbons, and dollies joined the army men on our toy shelves.

Letting (Hair) Go

What I’m going to tell you next is a True Confession of a tired mommy. Because our babies came close together and some had special needs, many nights-no, as long as we’re confessing I should honestly say: most nights-I bedded them down after a quick toothbrushing and a wishful promise to brush their hair the next morning. If hair happened to be in braids, the promise might be made several nights in a row while wispy hairs wrapped more and more intricately around their rubber bands.

When beauty parlor time finally came, my only hope of getting out their tangles was to spray my girls’ hair with a mélange of water, behentrimonium methosulfate, sodium benzoate, dimethicone, hydroxyethyl behenamidopropyl dimonium chloride, polysorbate 20, cetearyl alcohol, trisiloxane, citric acid, fragrance, ceteth-10, and laureth-4. And because tired mommy moments still happen, this threatening sounding broth (a name brand hair detangler and conditioner) has been my only resource-until now.

Taking a Shine to Your Hair

hairshinewebThese days, when Grace, our eleven-year-old daughter with Down syndrome, comes to me with a rubber band stuck in her self-styled pigtails, I grab Hair Shine by Beeyoutiful. This organic blend of aloe and the essential oils of lavender, rosemary, and citrus is all I need! I can pronounce the names of each ingredient and could even eat them safely if I wanted to. And the detangling ability of Hair Shine is just as good as the name brand alternative but with the added bonus that it doesn’t make the girls’ hair greasy. There’s also a value-added olfactory benefit. We smell fresh, clean and pretty thanks to the softly aromatic essential oils.

Ingredients for Many Uses

The aloe in Hair Shine comes from a plant much like the one I manage to keep alive to apply in case someone gets burned on our wood stove. It soothes and conditions your skin (and hair) while it adds shine.

The lavender is an especially hard worker in the mixture. It enhances body in your hair and is a major contributor to Hair Shine’s detangling and softening qualities. Like aloe, lavender is known for its use on burns, so putting the two together makes Hair Shine a cooling, healthy alternative to standard sunburn sprays. (Just make sure you don’t use it before you hit the sun-the sweet orange essential oil may actually increase photosensitivity in some people.)

Another use for Hair Shine is as a refreshing body spray, even on your face (close your eyes, of course). Here, the rosemary oil acts as an astringent and skin rejuvenator. And because Hair Shine can be sprayed on either wet or dry hair, you can get trigger happy from head to toe right out of the shower. There’s enough in the four-fluid-ounce bottle to give you hundreds of spritzes, so indulge yourself!

While I’m at it: there’s one other unsung benefit of Hair Shine I discovered once warm weather set in. Ticks-those disgusting arachnids only good for guinea hen food-and other biting bugs leave irritating itchy spots that Hair Shine soothes wonderfully.

But back to hair basics. My five girls and I represent examples of all hair types-fine, straight, curly, course, thick, and thin. Hair Shine helps keep straight hair from looking stringy (plus, the nice smell inspires you to spritz and brush more frequently), and it tones down the frizz of curly hair without the stiffness sometimes caused by other sculpting, frizz-control products. Not only that, Hair Shine costs much less than most alternatives sold through salons.

By the way, girls aren’t the only benefactors of Hair Shine. My 17-year-old son has fine, blond, curly hair. Even though he keeps it very short, the curls on the front can get a little out of hand, and while my mother’s heart loves those curls-remnants of his cherished toddlerhood- David’s not so thrilled with them. He’s accustomed to using water or even a little mousse to tame the twirls, but after allowing me to experiment on him with Hair Shine, he’s sold on the softness and taming for his hair, too. So, Hair Shine is right for pretty much everybody in your family. I wonder about the dog…

Beeyoutiful’s Products Mentioned in this Article:

Hair Shine Spray-In Conditioner

The Oil Crisis and Your – Summer 2008 Catalog

By Summer Moeller

With the prices of gas continuing to rise, oil is a frequent topic in the news. It turns out it’s also a part of most Americans’ beauty routine.

 

What? You don’t think it’s part of yours?

A 42-gallon barrel of oil makes about 19.4 gallons of gas; the rest is used to manufacture over 6,000 household products. You probably wouldn’t be surprised to know it’s used to produce paint, ammonia, antifreeze, linoleum, trash bags, bicycle tires, etc. But you might be surprised to know it’s also used for food preservatives, deodorant, cosmetics, aspirin, dentures, toiletries, and food packaging. (See more products made at http://www.ranken-energy.com/Products%20from%20Petroleum.htm .)

I don’t like the thought of using products on my face and skin that also have ingredients in them that are used in rubber cement and fishing boots. It seems like a no-brainer to look for all-natural products, but this is, in fact, a subject of great debate.

It’s estimated that the average American woman uses 9 products a day with 126 different chemicals in them. Have you ever tried deciphering the back of your lotion bottle, shampoo or lipstick tube? Would you know what methylparaben is? Do you know the effects it might have on your skin? Or Opium Graveolens? (Celery. Just having fun. :))

 

Cancer in Your Cosmetics?

I was amazed to find out that the FDA does not require cosmetics companies to perform any kind of testing to make sure their products are safe before they market them. They are also allowed to make all kinds of assertions, such as “hypoallergenic,” “good for sensitive skin,” and/or “allergy-tested,” that may have no validity to them. In fact, these products may contain ingredients that are irritating, bad for sensitive skin, and allergenic. It would be like me labeling my children “always behaves” or “lets me sleep in” or “never fights.” It looks good, but unfortunately just isn’t true.

Even the phrases “dermatologist tested” or “fragrance-free” do not necessarily mean anything. It simply could mean that a dermatologist tried out some cosmetics and liked them (or was paid to like them!). And “fragrance-free” products may actually contain fragrances; this label may just mean they have no noticeable fragrance.

Furthermore, some chemicals and ingredients used in cosmetics today in the US are banned in other countries because they are suspected carcinogens (cancer-causing agents)!

Petroleum (petrolatum, petroleum jelly) is one cosmetic ingredient that is causing a lot of heated argument. In the EU, it is banned for use in cosmetics unless it can be proven that it has been adequately refined; otherwise, it is suspected of causing cancer. In the US, there are no such regulations. Baby soaps, lotions, cosmetics, and toiletries often contain petroleum bases.

 

All Chemicals are Not Evil

While reading this article, keep in mind that even though the word “chemical” brings to mind things that are toxic, remember that everything in life is made up of chemicals. For example, water is made up of hydrogen and oxygen. Dihydrogen monoxide might seem a little scary sounding, but it’s just a scientific name for water. Similarly, some of the lists of ingredients in cosmetics and toiletries (and food for that matter!) just need a little research to find out their background. (One helpful book is A Consumer’s Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients: Complete Information About the Harmful and Desirable Ingredients Found in Cosmetics and Cosmeceuticals by Ruth Winter, M.S.)

Some manufacturers assert that there is nothing to a worry about; petroleum and other questionable chemicals have been around for decades. Others explain that there are only minute amounts of these chemicals, and that they are so diluted that they are not dangerous.

I, for a change, am skeptical of the popular cosmetic industry and more inclined to believe the claims of organic, natural-based cosmetics companies. Sixty percent of the chemicals we put on our skin are absorbed directly into our bloodstream. (That’s why some medications come in the form of patches.) It makes sense to me to scrutinize what we put on our skin.

 

Becoming the “Sherlock Holmes” of Skin Products

Finding out which companies distribute healthful, skin-friendly cosmetics and toiletries takes homework. Some companies, like Beeyoutiful, are full-disclosure companies-meaning that they will tell you everything that is put into the products they sell. Most companies are not. They will do as little as they can to inform you, and as much as they can to sell their product. High pricing does not necessarily mean it is a better or purer product.

 

vanilladreambodybutter1webI was anxious to try some of the all-natural products that Beeyoutiful sells, but I was dubious about their effectiveness. Vanilla is not my favorite scent, but when I opened up the Vanilla Dream Body Butter, I was pleasantly surprised that it was not a sickly sweet smell. It was a light and relaxing scent.

I was even more pleased at how it made my hands feel. I always wash my hands after putting on typical hand lotion. I hate how my hands feel greasy and slimy. With the Vanilla Dream Body Butter, I could feel the difference that the beeswax makes (vs. the petroleum base). There was no greasy feeling, but my hands felt softer and pampered.

 

hairshineweb

 

 

I was also pleased with the Hair Shine Conditioner. My daughter has curly hair, and I sampled it on her. I was surprised that the mixture of natural oils didn’t leave her hair looking oily. (At least her hair looked manageable; now could you please make an all-natural spray that repels dirt and peanut butter?)

 

 

 

My absolute favorite product was the Nature’s Touch Body Bar in Lemongrassnatures touch. I had been using bar soaps lately, but they always left my skin feeling tight and dry. I felt so luxurious using the lemongrass soap, and I loved the scent. It didn’t strip my skin of its natural moisturizers and left it feeling clean but smooth and soft.

After trying these and other products (did I mention that I’m hooked on Miracle Salve as a lip balm?), I was excited to find that buying all-natural products doesn’t mean sacrificing beauty or comfort for health. I’m finding that the right products actually cause your God-created natural beauty to shine by promoting health.

 

Making Your Skin Smile

Skin has a natural process of renewing that shouldn’t be inhibited. Every minute, we lose 30-40 thousand skin cells! We also sweat (cleansing our bodies of toxins and helping keep our bodies’ temperatures regulated) through our skin. It is a barrier from pathogens that would harm our body.

Not everyone will benefit from the same products. Some may have allergies that others do not. We all have different types of skin and are different ages and stages in life. In general, natural oils such as olive oil and coconut oil tend to lightly moisturize the skin while also allowing it to breathe. Heavy cleansers strip the skin of needed lipids, which keep the skin protected and moisturized.

I like being able to read a package and understand what is in it. I don’t like guessing when it comes to my health or my family’s health. For me, that will mean a lot more research and more time spent in the store scrutinizing labels.

Do your homework! Your skin will thank you for it, and so will your health!

 

Summer Burdett is a happy wife, mommy to two sweet girls, and enjoys dabbling in writing, photography and gardening-when she is not rescuing the girls from various disasters or trying to repair the house afterwards.

Beeyoutiful Products Mentioned in this Article:

–          Vanilla Dream Body Butter

–          Hair Shine Spray-In Conditioner

–          Nature’s Touch Body Bar

–          Miracle Skin Salve